Dr. Nancy’s Interests

Together, We Can Make A Difference

Right now, in every sector, women are making their voices heard. We are taking to the streets, gathering on social media, and organizing through numerous initiatives and movements. We truly are in this together, and we need to be in order to move to the next phase. While some may think this rise in conversation and feminine power may have started with the presidential election, or even with #MeToo, women gathering to further the common good started much, much sooner.

In 1848, a group of almost 200 women met at the Wesleyan Chapel in Seneca Falls, New York. The first ever women’s rights convention kicked off with. Reading of the “Declaration of Sentiments and Grievances” which detailed the injustices inflicted upon women in the United States and called on women to organize and petition for their rights. The Seneca Falls Convention was followed two weeks later by an even larger meeting in Rochester, New York. National women’s rights conventions were held annually after that, providing an important focus for the growing women’s suffrage movement. Through gatherings in Seneca Falls, a movement was born, and after years of struggle the 19th Amendment was adopted in 1920, granting American women the constitutionally protected right to vote.

The struggle continues as we work to close the gender pay gap, claim our rightful place in leadership positions, and live lives free of oppression and harassment. And guess what? In order to get that done, women are still gathering. The Women’s March saw 4.6 million women and men take to the streets and march to raise awareness on women’s rights as human rights in 642 cities on every continent on the globe. The anti-sexual assault and women’s empowerment movements #MeToo and#TimesUp have also shifted the conversation on women’s issues, and elevated the global consciousness surrounding the obstacles women encounter in their daily lives.

Numerous organizations have also taken root in the past decade to further the needs of women, and help us claim our fair share. For example, our very own Women Connect4Good Foundation supports and connects women to empower and lift up all women to break through barriers that prevent them from achieving sustainable, fulfilling lives and claim their power to change the world.

Take the Lead prepares, develops, inspires, and propels women to take their fair and equal share of leadership positions across all sectors by 2025, and their unique strategies create the breakthrough from where women have been stalled at 18-20% of top leadership positions for two decades.

Actually, when it comes to accelerating women’s leadership today, the sky is the limit. We’ve got Lean In, Emily’s List, Catalyst, Fem. Inc, Ellevate, Bossed Up, See Jane Do, SHEROES United, and more. And all of us are working towards the same goals – women’s empowerment. With training, tools, supports and awareness I truly believe that together we CAN make a difference.

The “I Am a Superwoman” Equality and Empowerment Summit, on Friday, August 24, is another great addition to the powerful movements happening all around us. Why is “I Am a Superwoman” important? Because women, sometimes at great personal risk, have fought for our rights in this country for nearly 200 years. However, our world is still divided and full of hate. In fact, in the United States 1.3 rapes per minute still happen. It is up to us to continue the fight, and work together to change the status quo.

“I Am a Superwoman” encourages us to assume personal accountability and individual responsibility for the future of our planet. It’s clear that a foundational shift in culture and leadership is essential. “I Am a Superwoman” highlights the need to recalibrate our societal mindset so we can move forward to create a better world for our children and for our community. It’s all about Equality. This is not a Partisan issue, it’s a Human issue. This movement is a critical step forward from the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements and aims to preserve and nurture the relationship between men and women. It’s time to re-direct our energies toward long term prevention focused on education and training programs that will stimulate positive change.

“I Am a Superwoman” invites women to build their legacy, and through the Superwoman Video Challenge urges women to prepare their Personal Bill of Rights. Wherever you are, simply pick up your phone and shoot a selfie video saying, “Here’s to the Superwomen who started the Equal Rights movement, and here is my personal Bill of Rights,” and share three to five things that you feel strongly about. Then you can post your video on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram and include #IAmaSuperwoman, #NowItsUp2Me, and SuperwomanDonations.org. Proceeds from the “I Am a Superwoman” activities will go to 501c3 organizations like SHEROES United, an organization my Leading Women co-author M. Bridget Cook-Burch founded that works tirelessly to help victims of sexual assault, domestic violence and human trafficking.

Remember, the momentum we gain when working together is unlike anything in the world. To find out more and get your ticket for the “I Am a Superwoman” Equality and Empowerment Summit, or to learn more about any of the “I Am a Superwoman” activities, go to SuperwomanCampaign.org.

We’re Still Marching and Making Our Voices Heard!


Right now, the next chapter of the women’s movement is being written – and it’s up to each and every one of us to help author it by fighting for what we believe in – Senator Kirsten Gillibrand
In 2017, on post-Inauguration Saturday, 4.6 million marched for women’s rights as human rights in 642 cities on every continent on the globe. One year later, women recognized that anniversary, and once again took to the streets to make their voices heard. Proving that there is power in numbers, hundreds of thousands of women gathered in major cities and small towns around the globe.
Last year women marched to express their outrage in what The New Yorker described as a, “shell-shocked solidarity.” With hundreds of issues among them, headlines generally spoke to the core issues surrounding women’s rights, with messages as diverse as the marchers.

Power To The Polls


This year, U.S. activities focused on a power-to-the-polls theme, with a focus on registering voters and encouraging women to run for office in 2018, and especially in the November midterm elections. Women’s March organizers launched a #PowerToThePolls campaign, which focuses on combating voter suppression and making sure that all people who are eligible to vote can easily exercise that right. Reuters reported that March organizers hope to build on the energy felt by Trump opponents after his surprise election victory and channel it into gains for progressive candidates in November’s midterm elections, and they used the weekend to work towards their goal of registering one million new voters. The campaign was timely as events took place against a backdrop of political dysfunction, with the federal government newly shutdown.

Pine Island ROAR Rally in Bokeelia, Florida


Nationwide, women and their families promised to use their votes to shift the course of American government during the mid-term elections. And in many areas where there wasn’t an official march, women organized and took to the streets as part of the #PowerToThePolls campaign to get people registered to vote and use their voices to shake up the status quo.

And We Marched…

Every event and gathering around the world had its moments, as energized crowds continued to work towards change. In Los Angeles, Viola Davis explained that her “testimony is one of poverty” and “one of being sexually assaulted.” She continued: “I know that every single day, when I think of that, I know that the trauma of those events are still with me today. And that’s what drives me to the voting booth. That’s what allows me to listen to the women who are still in silence.”
In New York, 23-year-old singer Halsey delivered a free-verse poem recounting her experiences with assault and feelings of powerlessness. Her poem closed with strong words of hope and encouragement that triggered an outpouring of support and gratitude from around the world. “We are not free until all of us are free. So, love your neighbor, please treat her kindly. Ask her story and then shut up and listen. Black, Asian, poor, wealthy, trans, cis, Muslim, Christian. Listen, listen and then yell at the top of your lungs. Be a voice for all those who have prisoner tongues. For the people who had to grow up way too young. There is work to be done. There are songs to be sung. Lord knows there’s a war to be won.”
In Washington, D.C. Democratic National Committee chairman Tom Perez emphasized the number of women running on the party’s ticket in November. “If the Congress, if the White House, if the governorships across America had more women like I see here today, we would be a much better America.”

We Marched With Our Male Allies

For many men, this year’s #MeToo movement raised greater awareness of the fight for gender equality and led them to participate more fully in the events. In Las Vegas, men at Sunday’s march said they felt an obligation to speak out about their gender’s treatment of women and stand beside women as allies. That’s good news because leading into the 2017 Women’s March, some men weren’t sure what role, if any, they should play in the day’s events. Men were “slow to support” the march, Washington Post writer Michael Alison Chandler wrote at the time, because they worried that attending a demonstration led by women would make them seem “unmasculine.”

Pine Island ROAR Rally in Bokeelia, Florida

Will the March Be as Effective?

There was some concern leading into the weekend’s events that the movement that began with the Women’s March one year ago lacked the cohesiveness to move forward. Experts speculated that there were too many special interests and too many different messages to truly affect change. However, what’s important to remember is that it has brought change and done what it was established to do. One year ago, the Women’s March aimed to start a movement of women from all walks of life who would continue their activism long after they had gone home. In many ways, that goal has been realized.
One year ago, thousands of women threw themselves into activism for the first time in their lives, and the march events provided a rare chance to build a network of like-minded people. The networks that were formed in 2017 have grown and expanded, and the women involved remain active.
Jo Reger, a professor of sociology at Oakland University in Michigan was quoted in the New York Times as saying that the feminist movement, like other important social movements, has always had people coming together and then breaking apart. “We think it looks so chaotic and full of factions and what it really looks like is every other social movement. Often those factions end up coming back together later on.”
Whether you marched, registered voters, or supported your sisters on the street in some other way, it’s time to turn our focus to the polls, register voters and support women preparing to run. It is at the polls that we can truly affect change and create a world where women and men don’t have to march in protest, but instead live in a world where equality is the standard, and women are safe in the workplace, and in the community. Change starts now. Let’s work together. To make it happen.

Dr. Nancy D. O’Reilly To Receive Take The Lead’s First Leading Woman Award

Dr. Nancy D. O’Reilly will be recognized in New York City on Tuesday, November 14, at Take The Lead Day, an event sponsored by Take The Lead, and celebrated around the world in a series of skill-based workshops, interactive panels, livestream watch parties and webinars in an additional 89 cities and 10 countries. In an evening featuring music, poetry, theater and a speech by former US Treasurer Rosie Rios, Dr. Nancy will receive the first Leading Woman Award in recognition of her many contributions to the advancement and empowerment of women.
“Nancy’s generosity is exceeded only by her wisdom as a board member and her indomitable optimism about our ability to achieve our mission of gender parity in leadership,” said Take The Lead’s cofounder and president, and Leading Women co-author Gloria Feldt. “Creating an award that derives from the title of her book seems perfect as a way to honor her on the first Take The Lead Day and by extension each time we give the award in the future.”
“Take The Lead Day is the perfect way for women to come together to discover solutions and employ specific strategies to achieve gender equity in leadership by 2025,” Dr. Nancy added. “If you can’t be in New York, that’s okay.  Sign up for some of the free and virtual events and live streaming.”
Take The Lead prepares, develops, inspires and propels women to take their fair and equal share of leadership positions across all sectors by 2025. It’s today’s women’s movement — a unique catalyst for women to embrace power and reach leadership parity. To sign up for the live, virtual, and streaming events, go to TakeTheLeadDay.com.
Dr. Nancy and the Women Connect4Good foundation share Take The Lead’s mission of advancing women to leadership parity by 2025.

We Need More Women in Leadership

The world needs more women in leadership. The problems we face today – from our local communities to the workplace, and the global stage – require diverse leaders who have a variety of skill sets. Women bring the additional skills needed, as well as a different perspective to drive effective solutions. In short, female leaders change the game, and in many cases, change the way the world does business.
Perhaps one of the best snapshots of where we are, and how far we have to go, is the Women in the Workplace report from McKinsey and LeanIn.org. This year’s report, which was just released, has results from 222 companies that completed a survey of human resource practices and shared pipeline data for their total combined workforce of more than 12 million people. More than 70,000 employees also completed a survey about their experiences regarding gender, opportunity, career, and work-life issues.
The report’s findings illustrate the well-known obstacles to womens’ leadership that have been identified in previous reports – slow career advancement, fewer raises and promotions, and more obstacles for women of color. In spite of the fact that women make up 50% of the workforce, have higher education levels than men, are often the primary breadwinners in their families. Also study after study demonstrates that having more women in the workplace can lead to significantly higher productivity and efficiency. So what is the hold up?
First of all, for many it is a matter of perspective, and requires shedding light on the facts to shift perception. According to Women in the Workplace, “When it comes to how women and men see the state of women and gender diversity efforts, there are striking differences. Men are more likely to think the workplace is equitable; women see a workplace that is less fair and offers less support. Men think their companies are doing a pretty good job supporting diversity; women see more room for improvement. Given the persistent lag in women’s advancement, women have the more accurate view.”
We also need to raise the bar. Women in the Workplace finds that, “Nearly 50 percent of men think women are well represented in leadership in companies where only one in ten senior leaders is a woman. A much smaller but still significant number of women agree: a third think women are well represented when they see one in ten in leadership.”
We also need to give women the support they need, not only in their day-to-day work, but on the road to advancement. Women in the Workplace finds that women are less likely to receive advice from managers and senior leaders on how to advance, and employees who do are more likely to say they’ve been promoted in the last two years. Similarly, women are less likely to interact regularly with senior leaders, yet employees who do so are more likely to aspire to be top executives.
We can’t unlock the full potential of women in the workplace, in the community, or in our homes until we see how far from equality we really are. That means it is up to all of us to raise awareness of the true status of women in leadership, and celebrate each woman’s accomplishments. By recognizing that we do indeed need more women in leadership, and working together to help women gain confidence and the skills they need to overcome barriers and reach their goals, we truly can change the world into one of 50/50 parity, where both genders value each contribution and shed the concept of living in a male-dominated culture.

Leading Women Co-Author Releases New Book and Documentary

March is a busy month for my Leading Women co-author Linda Rendleman. Not only does it see the release of her third book, Women Like Us – Together Changing the World, but also the premier of the documentary it inspired, Women Like Us – Three Journeys. One Mission. To Change the World, which is showing at the Los Angeles Women’s Film Festival on March 25.
“Women Like Us” – the film is a call-to-action for women everywhere as they join together and use their innate skills of compassion, courage, and voices to confront injustices and promote equality and education for all humanity. The film follows three women on a moving journey of exploration. Throughout their travels, you’ll experience their personal journeys of adversity and evolution, and witness the unimaginable social injustices women face around the globe.
Film producer Sally Colon-Petree and award-winning journalist Catt Sadler joined Linda to travel the US and Kenya and engage in conversations with over fourteen astounding women. The filmmakers impart valuable lessons learned from powerful role models such as Ida Odinga, former First Lady of Kenya; Caroline Barnett, cofounder of the Los Angeles Dream Center; CNN Hero Robin Emmons; Dianne Hudson, executive producer of the Oprah Winfrey show and many more.
Linda says that screenings of the film in tandem with book signings at locations across the country are being planned in an effort to create awareness, discussion and action for change through women’s leadership. One event is planned in Los Angeles in May, and another in Indianapolis in July.
Women Like Us – Together Changing the World focuses on the stories of well-known and little-known women who are coming together in their own way with their own voices to speak up for the vulnerable, link arms with compassion and connection, and share how the reader, in her own way, can be part of the change. I was honored to be able to contribute to this project, and share some of the lessons learned and insights gained along the way.
“I was honored to have Dr. Nancy O’Reilly as one of the authors,” Linda said. “Her story, and the stories of 18 other women, serve as a message to women and girls everywhere that yes, you too can reach out and make an impact in the world on whatever level and however you decide.”
Linda is an award-winning speaker and an author who focuses on sharing motivating and uplifting strategies to support women to be the best that they can be. Her first book, Women Like Us – Real Stories and Strategies for Living your Best Life, was published eight years ago, and was the impetus for the Women Like Us Foundation. She quickly followed that book project with Women Like Us – Illuminating the World.
The Women Like Us Foundation is committed to sustaining women’s leadership through creating awareness of women-led initiatives and granting funds. Operating under the mission of promoting gender equality and social justice through women’s leadership, increasing awareness and offering stability in key areas led by women, the Foundation envisions an educated world with equality for all individuals and collectively coming together in support of social justice. To find out more about the Women Like Us Foundation, click HERE.
 

Women Connect4Good Working For Parity

On December 20, 262 women (and men) came together to effectively change the world. That was the day that Women Connect4Good Inc. partnered with Take The Lead Women in an exciting and monumental 24-hour crowdfunding campaign to support them in their effort to propel women to take their fair and equal share of leadership positions across all sectors by 2025. As a part of the effort, we had 24 hours to raise $300,000. Women Connect4Good Foundation pledged to match every dollar up to $300.000. Other sponsors also pledged to match additional funds to achieve $600,000 in 24 hours.
We not only met that goal, we surpassed it. Through crowdsourcing we were able to raise $312,160!!! Take The Lead will use these funds as well as the Women Connect4Good match to support program growth, provide more free community resources, and give more women the training, mentorship and coaching they need to take the lead in their own lives and careers.
Take the Lead founder and Leading Women co-author Gloria Feldt was thrilled with the response, and touched by the Women Connect4Good contribution. “I don’t think I personally can ever honor and thank her (Dr. Nancy) enough. The money is great and essential, but it’s what the money MEANS for the future of this leadership parity movement that is most significant.”
“We were just at the place where we couldn’t possibly deliver on our mission in a truly significant way without building an infrastructure to support it. I was trying to do everything and that was just not sustainable,” Gloria added.  “This campaign, which could only have happened because of Nancy’s vision and collaborative spirit, is enabling Take The Lead to kick start the future. People love matching gifts because they know their own contributions will be doubled in value, and in this case, they were quadrupled in value, then Nancy matched them all!!”
The parallel missions of Women Connect4 Good and Take The Lead intersect with women’s empowerment, gender parity by 2025 and the support of women to work together to create a better world. It has always been Women Connect4 Good’s mission to educate people to develop women-helping-women networks to raise the status of women and change the world. And that runs perfectly with Take The Lead’s work.
Gloria, and Take The Lead’s co-founder Amy Litzenberger, a former investment banker with extensive experience in strategic planning and funding of start-up and emerging growth companies, came together in 2013 to form the organization. Amy was questioning why women had stalled at 18-20% across all sectors. Gloria, who had spent over 30 years advancing women, including having served as President and CEO of Planned Parenthood Federation of America, had been so obsessed with the very question Amy asked that she had literally written the book on it, No Excuses, 9 Ways Women Can Change How We Think About Power.
We both wanted to build a better world for the women we loved and respected,” Gloria said. “We did it for our friends and colleagues, women we watched hit the glass ceiling again and again. We did it for our daughters, hopeful we could create the right tools to help them embrace their power and live their lives without limits. We did it because we wanted to see women reach leadership equality and pay equity in our lifetime.
As Gloria says, as a community, we are united by our shared commitment and vision for equality. And as individuals, we must each do our part to support this movement and to build a better world. At Women Connect4Good, we can think of no better way to start a new year than to join hands with other women and together, change the world.
Donations to Women Connect4Good and Take The Lead Women are both tax deductible if you want to join us and help push these issues forward.

This Season is the Perfect Time to Invest in Women

10498411_621812561264504_955884005606031384_oAt the recent Fortune-TIME Global Forum in Rome, Cherie Blair and Bineta Diop joined New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof to discuss the ways that the private sector has both a moral and commercial interest in harnessing the power of women and girls to grow their business. All three speakers agreed that focusing on girls’ education and female economic empowerment is not just a matter of social responsibility but is instrumental in driving growth.
“It’s not just about doing good,” said Diop, Special Envoy for Women, Peace and Security for the African Union. “It’s also doing the smart things because women have the capacity and knowledge and competence to bring another dimension into the workplace.”
There has been extensive research suggesting that investing money in women, whether in education or supporting women as entrepreneurs, is highly cost effective. USAid, a U.S. Government agency that works to end extreme global poverty, reports that aid programs that provide women opportunities to better their health, education, and well-being have effects far beyond a single individual. In fact, a woman multiplies the impact of an investment made in her future by extending benefits to the world around her, creating a better life for her family and building a strong community.
Melinda Gates has found that helping women and girls is not only the right thing to do, it is essential to global development. She recently was quoted in Fortune Magazine as saying, “If you want to make life better for a community, you should start by investing in its women and girls.”
“When I talk to women, a universal desire is to bring every good thing to our kids. Women tend to spend their resources on their families—prioritizing things like healthcare, nutritious food, education, and all the building blocks of a thriving society,” Gates said. “The way I think about it is that when we invest in women, we invest in the people who invest in everyone else. So, when we match their commitment with our own, great things are possible.”
On the global front, Convoy of Hope and their Women’s Empowerment program has a tremendous impact helping women around the world to realize their value and reach their potential through job training and education. As a result of the program – which features a Women’s Micro-Enterprise Program, Mother’s Club, and Empowered Girls components – many women throughout El Salvador, Ethiopia, Honduras, Kenya, Nicaragua, the Philippines and Tanzania now own businesses that enable them to feed and care for their own children. This matters because of the 1.3 billion people living in abject poverty, 70 percent are women. As Kara Edson, director of the program says, “That’s unacceptable. We’re helping women break the cycle of poverty.”
On a business front, it boils down to encouraging female participation in the workforce and clearing the way for women to reach leadership positions. Morgan Stanley research teams recently reported that calls for more female participation in the economy have grown louder, often based on political or cultural arguments founded on fairness. Yet, a persuasive argument for diversity and equality is also anchored to the bottom line. Quantitative analysis showed that ensuring that more women are working and leading in the workplace is simply good business, especially for investors who not only care about the ethics, but also want returns.
One way you can invest in women is by advocating for women in the workplace and by being a mentor. Mentors matter, and many women in business today attribute part of their success to lessons learned through a mentoring relationship. On one level, a mentor helps women become empowered, with more self-confidence and resolve. On another, mentors serve as a guide, role model and advisor.
When women win, we all win, which is why now is the perfect time to reach out and look for ways to help. It is up to all of us to build strong support systems, and help one another while connecting in the workplace, the community, and the world at large. And bottom line, the best investment you can make is a personal commitment to help a woman step into her own power and create the life she deserves!
 

Calling All Women Ambassadors and Expert Trainers

AmbassadorsPostcardEverywhere you look, women are changing the face of leadership. Why? Because they are tired of waiting. They want to see gender parity in leadership in their lifetimes. At the current pace, this will not happen until 2095. Some powerful leaders of today’s women’s movement are gathering in Santa Barbara April 19-21 to help bring about that change. It’s all about collaboration and women helping other women.
Like Elisa Parker, Grass Valley, CA, who started her SeeJaneDo radio program six years ago with a grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. “My girls were then four and seven,” Elisa recalls, “and they were questioning why their world seemed so broken. I felt I had to try to create a world that served them, to create a platform for women’s voices to bring about change.” Part of her strategy is to participate in the April Santa Barbara training to become a Leadership Ambassador.
Women made great progress in the Sixties, Seventies and Eighties, yet their share of leadership has remained stuck at less than 20 percent for decades. It’s even worse for women of color. Doors have been opened, yet most women still do not step through to join the ranks of leadership.
Activist leaders have noticed their reluctance and begun to organize in earnest. Contrary to the stereotype of bitchy women, these women love to collaborate and partner with others. Elisa’s effort is one of thousands, led by ordinary women and stars alike, all determined to change the power equation: Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In, Kimberly Bryant’s Black Girls Code organization, Rinku Sen’s Race Forward organization, Jennifer Seibel Newsom’s #AskHerMore campaign, Geena Davis’s Institute on Gender in Media, just to name a few. This movement is characterized by mutual support, encouragement and collaboration.
Longtime women’s rights advocate Gloria Feldt, a former national president of Planned Parenthood and co-founder of Take The Lead, says these powerful leaders are ready to take it to the next level. She says women can achieve parity in leadership across all sectors by 2025, that she can teach them how, and that it’s time to share her knowledge so others can do it, too. Exemplifying the collaborative trend, Take The Lead currently partners with more than 40 universities, leadership organizations and businesses.
Dr. Nancy agrees. That’s why Women Connect4Good, Inc., is underwriting Gloria’s next Train-the-Trainer in Santa Barbara, April 20-21. An application form to participate is available online. After interviewing Gloria years ago for a podcast about women’s relationships with power, they collaborated on Leading Women.
Gloria began sharing her signature 9 Power Tools curriculum with other expert trainers last year in order to accelerate women’s progress. She trained 16 diverse Leadership Ambassadors in New York City and Phoenix in 2015, all of whom were already experts working in the field, and now are qualified to deliver the training to companies and organizations.
The Santa Barbara training is the third Train-the-Trainer offered by Gloria and Take The Lead Head of Strategy, Lex Schroeder. Gloria said, “We are so excited to connect with courageous women leaders on the West Coast, by bringing Take The Lead’s training to California.”
Fast Facts

  • Women make up more than 50% of the population, are 59% of the college-educated, entry-level workforce, and control 85% of consumer spending.
  • The rapid advances women made into leadership in the 1970s and 1980s have largely stalled.
  • Whether counting women on corporate boards, in the C-suite, in politics, behind the camera or at the editor’s desk – none of the percentages rise above 20%, and most are much lower.

About the Training

  • Certified trainers can incorporate the material into their own brands or teach as a certified Leadership Ambassador with Take The Lead.
  • This training focuses on:
    • Achieving gender parity in leadership, which means advancing women to occupy half of all top leadership and decision-making roles across all sectors by 2025. This goes beyond just teaching them leadership skills.
    • Cracking the code of implicit bias that has held women back to less than 20% of leadership for decades.
    • Changing the definition of power itself. Rejecting the oppressive “power over” and claiming the “power to” accomplish something by joining with others. These concepts change women’s feeling about power from “love-hate” into “I can’t wait to use this!”
    • Fostering “Collaboration as strategy” to achieve collective leadership and systemic change through strategic partnerships.
    • Creating an intergenerational movement of women leaders,
  •  Women who become trainers join a diverse, supportive community of powerful, motivated women of all ages and backgrounds. Some are building their training businesses; all are motivated primarily to uplift and advance other women.
  • The certification process includes marketing assistance and membership in the supportive community of Leadership Ambassadors.
  • There is a fee, however organizers will seek to match participants with scholarships where possible.
  • To apply to take part in the training or for more information http://www.taketheleadwomen.com/leadership-power-tools-training/

About Take The Lead

  • Take The Lead’s 2014 launch, co-sponsored by Arizona State University and dozens of other local and national groups, filled a 3,000-seat auditorium and reached 500,000 globally via livestream.
  • Take The Lead prepares, develops, inspires, and propels women to take their fair and equal share of leadership positions across all sectors by 2025. It’s today’s women’s movement, the needed game changer, a unique way for women to embrace power and leadership parity.
  • In addition to offline leadership events, Take The Lead regularly hosts online learning programs, including free monthly Virtual Happy Hours and on demand learning programs, including the online certificate course version of the “9 Leadership Power Tools To Advance Your Career” workshop.
  • See more than 40 partners in Take The Lead mission
  • Read bios of diverse Leadership Ambassadors

What are you waiting for? If you are an expert trainer and want to join other women leaders, redefine power and help uplift and advance other other women, this Leadership Ambassador Train The Trainer is for you. As a Leadership Ambassador, you will bring this transformative work to new audiences so that together, we can bring women to leadership parity by 2025. Remember, it’s all about collaboration and women helping other women, and together we can do more then we can ever do on our own. Find out more about Train The Trainer HERE.
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Open Yourself to Healthy Relationships

Relationship2015FlyerFrontMont-2-370x283Do you struggle with relationships? With others and with yourself? You don’t have to suffer anymore. On April 1-3 in Santa Barbara, California, a groundbreaking workshop will teach you how to discover your true self and find relationships that work for you. Relationship N’ You is a seminar designed especially for exceptional women who are looking to create positive and healthy relationships—all kinds of relationships—whether you have a current relationship, would like to create one with a new partner, or want to build new connections with a friend, neighbor, coworker, or an employee.
By identifying the blocks to forming healthy relationships, this seminar will help attendees step away from situations that could be based in doubt, fear, lack and insecurity. One way to remove these blocks is by parenting one’s inner child, which has repeatedly sabotaged past relationships. There are many men and women who appear to be adults when, in truth, there is a young child within them still looking to be heard, seen, loved, and given attention – a situation that must be addressed so it can be healed.  Healing the inner child leads to a fully functioning, mature adult ready for a new healthy relationship. This seminar will also shed light on the different types of soul mates so that you can discover what you are truly looking for and if the one you are with is actually the one!
Attendees will leave with powerful processes to clear away the energies of the unconscious that get in the way of having healthy relationships, as well as various tools to help you move forward – including three different benchmarks that are very beneficial when entering into any new relationship. The final result is great progress towards further deepening in your discovery of your true self!
The workshop will feature Dale Haloway, Master Teacher and Transformational Expert. For more information, go to www.MontecitoUrbanFarms.com or call Alex Thomson at 805-893-7401.

One Woman Really Can Make A Difference

Tsvetta2I support today’s women-helping-women movements because we create our greatest impact when we work together and support each other. That is how we can transform our lives and the world. I also believe that to truly unleash a woman’s full potential, we have to reach out to young girls and give them the tools they need for a truly empowered life. That’s why I was excited when I heard about the achievements of Tsvetta Kaleynska. Tsvetta was born in Bulgaria in 1988 and is the daughter of a university professor and a doctor. Her experience growing up in Eastern Europe then relocating to the United States showed her how freedom can be defined in entirely different ways. With this new understanding, Tsvetta became passionate about wanting to help other young Bulgarian girls live a life where they too could feel empowered.
In 2004 while still in Bulgaria, Tsvetta attended a US Peace Corps empowerment initiative camp called GLOW, which stands for Girls Leading Our World, and says it changed her life. GLOW began in 1995 with the Peace Corps in Romania, and launched in Bulgaria in 2000, to address the emotional and educational needs of adolescent girls. The program was so successful that over the last 20 years it has been implemented in many other countries around the world.
Today in Bulgaria Leadership Academy GLOW is a seven-day experience that is aimed at helping young Bulgarian girls reach and explore their potential as future leaders. The academy is based on the informal learning method “peers teach peers,” which means that leaders are former participants in the academy, who showed great leadership and teamwork skills, commitment and motivation. Leadership Academy GLOW gives the young women the opportunity to identify and develop skills, demonstrate their strengths, increase their knowledge of current issues, and nurture self-confidence, which enables them to make valuable contributions to their own communities. Approximately 70-80 girls a year take part in the camp and it also gives them a chance to learn English which is a huge selling point because Tsvetta says there aren’t a lot of opportunities for girls to learn English regularly.
After several years of ramping down, The Peace Corps phased out the GLOW program at the end of 2013 after 13 years of successfully enabling girls to have the vision of what a better future looks like. That was not going to happen to the young women of Bulgaria though, not on Tsvetta’s watch. She knew that GLOW changed her life, that’s why for the past eight years she has made it her mission to keep GLOW going in her home country. While she originally planned to help out with GLOW fundraising, over the years has established herself as the volunteer leader of the organization. She manages all aspects of the camp, including the successful delegation of each department to volunteer staff.
In 2014 her hard work was recognized in a big way, when she won the Steve Award for the ‘Women Helping Women Globally’ category. The annual Steve Awards were created to honor and generate public recognition of the achievements and positive contributions of businesswomen from around the world. Tsvetta was nominated for her work with the GLOW Leadership Program.
Humble is an understatement when it comes to Tsvetta and the work she has done. For such a young woman to have done so much is truly inspiring! May the world recognize and celebrate more young women like Tsvetta. Her determination to make the experiences that helped her succeed available to other young women is what the women-helping-women movement is all about! WomenConnect4Good applauds her and hopes her example will inspire many other women around the world.
 
 
 

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