networking

Who Are You, As An Individual?

Author, Speaker, Coach

Elizabeth Suarez

Who are you is the first question coach and author Elizabeth Suarez asks her clients. She said that women almost always answer in terms of who they are married to, or who their children are. Elizabeth said the key is you can’t have what you want until you decide who you are as an individual. Yes, you have relationships with those other people, but who you are, what your interests are and how you feel about your family all combine to unleash your negotiation potential for yourself.
Elizabeth praised her mother for not giving up after her father died. Her mother was a tremendous negotiator for everyone else, but not for herself. Elizabeth worked her way up the corporate ladder in the days when she was told to keep her place and put in her time. She was told when she reached a certain level, people would listen to her ideas. Today’s world is changing and she feels that we all have the right and responsibility to contribute, but first you have to figure out who you are.

Key to Getting Everything

Elizabeth’s new book, The Art of Getting Everything, looks at our personal talents and traits as “net worth.” We all have it, but we must assess it honestly and identify how we contribute to the greater good in our careers and elsewhere in life. She compared it to navigating the New York subway, which is necessary to survive and get around in NYC. There are three major lines in life that may intersect anywhere:

  • Your career
  • Your family
  • Your interests

The foundation of getting everything is figuring out how to navigate the intersections. Elizabeth encourages her clients to get outside of their bubble and network with others to get help negotiating these intersections. In this interview, she used the example of someone who is expecting a baby and was just asked to be the CEO of a major company branch. This woman doubted her ability to do it all when she remembered meeting another woman who had twins while launching a new international division that moved several million dollars in revenue.  Elizabeth advised us to learn from other people’s stories, to reach out and listen to those stories and share ours as much as possible. You never know when you need that valuable lesson or that intersection of abilities to help you through a difficult time. It’s important to remember that you can have it all, but maybe not all at the same time.

Put Your Own Face Mask on First

Since Elizabeth spends a lot of time flying, she used the instructions from the flight attendant as the most crucial bit of career advice. Take care of yourself and the rest will fall into place. Start by doing this one thing for yourself–listen to this podcast. Then go to Elizabeth’s website and download the free “Negotiation Unleashed” Workbook to think through the key pieces to your net worth. Buy her book, and get started developing your skills in a new art form, The Art of Getting Everything.

11 Ways to Connect vs Compete with Other Women

Competing with other women is out. Connecting with other women to share ideas, work together on projects, and offer support is in. The changes brought about by the global economy have made collaboration and innovation “must-have” skills, and the great news is that women tend to be naturals at them. And that, says clinical psychologist Dr. Nancy D. O’Reilly, is why the women-helping-women movement is really picking up steam.
“We’re making a shift to what I call ‘Connecting 2.0,’” says O’Reilly, who along with 19 other women, co-wrote the new book Leading Women: 20 Influential Women Share Their Secrets to Leadership, Business, and Life. ”It’s more meaningful than the ‘mile-wide and inch-deep’ type of connecting we associate with social media. It’s based on sharing and co-creating, not self-interest. It’s authentic, it feels good, and it works.”
This deeper approach to connecting works so well, in fact, that we are creating an ever-expanding network of resources offering expertise and support to women in business, government, education, philanthropy, and other fields. The idea is not just to advance our careers and make money, but to make life itself richer, more exciting, and more creative.
“This is more than a trend; it’s a movement—and women are loving it,” says O’Reilly. “More and more smart, amazing women are connecting to help their ‘sisters’ live their very best lives. These like-minded women are passionate about making the world a better place—so they are finding one another and building strong, supportive communities.”
The women-helping-women movement is nothing like the phony, self-serving, let’s-exchange-cards-and-move-on networking that most of us hate. Sure, connecting with other women does pay off in amazing ways, but the rewards flow organically from our “feminine strengths” and a genuine desire to make a difference in the lives of others.
You may be wondering, Where do I sign up? The answer is “everywhere.” This is not some exclusive club—it’s open to all women with passion, enthusiasm, and a yearning to live a richer, more fulfilling life and maybe even change the world. But O’Reilly knows you may not be used to thinking this way. That’s why she offers the following tips:

  • First things first: Aim for a good mix of online and face-to-face connecting. It’s easy to send an email message, and it’s really easy to like, to share, to follow in the world of social media. That’s why so many women do it. (It’s easy to push a key or click a mouse after all.) And while there is nothing wrong with social media, it’s also no substitute for real-world human interaction. The women-helping-women movement depends on both types of connecting: virtual and face-to-face.

“If you’re burning up social media, consider taking an online contact offline,” she advises. “Tell her you’d love to meet her for lunch the next time she’s in town. Conversely, if you’re proudly ‘old school’ and are neglecting your social media presence, dive in. You really need a foot in both worlds.”

  • Join a new group that interests you and really attend the meetings.Make them a priority. It doesn’t matter what activity it’s based on. This may be a book circle or a kayaking club or a community cause. What’s important is that you’re getting together with other women who share a common interest—and that you go to meetings and events often enough to let these strong connections develop.

“It’s the shared passion for the activity that generates the connections,” notes O’Reilly. “And those connections take on a life of their own. You may end up forging alliances, finding jobs, winning clients—even though that’s not the ‘purpose’ for the group.”

  • Get on a different team at work. We tend to stick to our comfort zone. But shaking things up from time to time keeps you sharp and puts you in the path of exciting new people. When you work with women you don’t know on projects you’re unfamiliar with, you will learn, grow, and often discover vital new talents and interests.
  • Get involved in a philanthropic cause that speaks to your heart.Women who care enough about others to volunteer their time, talents, and treasure are the kinds of women you want to meet. They tend to be “other-oriented” and want to make new connections, too. So whether your “cause” is homeless animals, kids with cancer, adult literacy, or clean oceans, get involved.

“I actually met the 19 women who co-wrote the book through my Women Connect4Good, Inc., foundation,” she adds. “In fact, the book is living proof of the kind of collaboration that happens when women make connections based on their desire to serve.”

  • Think about what you need to learn. Seek out mentors who can help you learn it. Let’s say you have a small catering company specializing in weddings, parties, and family reunions. You’d like to expand into the healthcare conference arena but know nothing about the field. You might reach out to someone who plans such conferences and offer to trade services—perhaps cater an upcoming event for free or for a greatly reduced price—in exchange for the chance to learn and get a foot in the door.

“You’re not asking for something for free,” notes O’Reilly. “You’re also bringing something to the table. Who knows: Her clients may love your fresh approach, and it could result in the two of you starting a whole new venture.”

  • Likewise, give back to women who need your expertise. In other words, don’t just seek out mentors. Be a mentor to women who can benefit from your knowledge and experience. It’s “good karma” and it can pay off in unexpected ways.
  • Take a class. (And don’t just sit there; talk to your neighbor.) Whether it’s continuing education for your job, a creative writing class at the local community college, or even a martial arts training session, actively pursue new knowledge and skills. This will bring new and interesting women into your life—women who, just by being there, show that they have a zest for life and learning.
  • Volunteer your speaking services.Yes, yes, you hate public speaking. Many women do. But taking to the podium is a powerful way to get your voice heard, to build up your confidence, and of course to make new connections with those who hear you speak. And there are many civic and service organizations—like the Chamber of Commerce and Rotary Club—that need speakers.
  • Handpick five to ten powerful women in your community and ask them to participate in an event. This might be a roundtable discussion that takes place at an industry conference or a community fundraiser, for example. And don’t think that busy, important women won’t have time for you, says O’Reilly.

“Remember, women love sharing stories, best practices, and ideas,” she says. “You might be surprised by how many will say yes.”

  • If you’re invited, go.When someone invites you to an event or gathering—whether it’s an industry trade show, a party, or a hiking trip—go if you can. Yes, even if you’re tired, out-of-sorts, and feeling blah.

“Say yes if it’s remotely possible,” advises O’Reilly. “There are always reasons to say no and some of them are good reasons. But overall, life rewards action. Life rewards yes. The more times you say yes, the more connections you will make. The more connections you make, the richer and more creative your life will be.”

  • Set a goal to meet “X” new women per month. Insert your own number, depending on your circumstances and personality. Hold yourself to this number (it will help greatly to keep track in a journal or calendar). If you take this metric seriously, you’ll figure out how to make it happen. And while meeting isn’t the same as connecting, it’s the essential first step.

“Let’s say your goal is to meet five new women this month, and it’s the last day of the month and you have two to go,” says O’Reilly. “You can always pop into the spin class at your gym, or maybe go to an open house or political rally. While you’re there, of course, strike up conversations with at least two women and introduce yourself.” Voilà! You’ve met your goal!

While women are naturally good at connecting, it doesn’t happen automatically, notes O’Reilly. We really do have to make an effort.
“Most of us are so busy and overwhelmed that we just don’t make it a priority to connect with other women,” she says. “We really do have to be deliberately purposeful about it. The benefits of connecting with other women are incredible, so we owe it to ourselves—and each other—to make it happen.”

~

First appeared February 17, 2015 in Homebased Working Moms http://www.hbwm.com/blogs/view/4224
Home-Based Working Moms is a professional association and online community of parents who work at home and those who would like to. It provides a variety of opportunities and resources to help moms network, learn and grow in their role as a home-based working mom.

Women Economic Forum to Meet in Santa Barbara

wef-india-groupAn initiative of ALL Ladies League, the first ever Women’s Economic Forum (WEF) took place in India in winter 2016 and was attended by 400 people representing 25 countries.  The purpose was to bring together women from all walks of society with an international reach, giving them a chance to connect, learn from one another and hear inspirational speakers to motivate them to excel at their amazing work. Find out more about the first WEF conference and how through their mission, the ALL Ladies League is working to change the world through celebrating diversity, crossing cultures, sharing our sense of humanity and leading with the feminine.
wef-india2Dr. Nancy attended the forum in New Delhi and said the level of networking absolutely blew her away. “All day, all night, in the conference rooms and the hotel hallways, women were drumming, sharing, and getting to know each other,” said Dr. Nancy. “It was wonderful and I cant wait for the next one!”
Now, this amazing spirit of collaboration has come to the United States.  The first regional WEF,  November 12-15, 2016, plans to welcome women from 200 countries and all 50 states at the Bacara Resort & Spa in beautiful Santa Barbara, CA, an inspiring environment of mountains and the Pacific Ocean. The purpose for the regional WEF is the same: to connect women from all over the world, provide a venue where they can meet, share their stories and engage with other women and the men who support them.  Click here for program information.
A special conference retreat takes place on Friday before the conference. Register here  to attend the forum. If you would like to speak to the assembled Forum contact Tia Walker, twalker110@aol.com.
wef-usa

Sheila Robinson Turns Adversity into Opportunity

Sheila Robinson, CLO, Ed.D.

Sheila Robinson, CLO, Ed.D.


Dr. Sheila Robinson is the poster woman for turning adversity into opportunity. As an African American born in the South, she faced barriers based on her looks and background that she didn’t think possible. She focused on solutions, not problems; she looked for ways to make things better and urged others to be the best they could be. Her journey through her life experiences, which sometimes hurt to the core, hardened her resolve to be a courageous advocate for women helping women and lifting up everyone from all races, cultures and backgrounds.
Sheila founded Diversity Woman Magazine for women seeking career advancement and a national conference that ranks among the most beneficial in the country. Among her many awards is being named one of the 50 Top Women in Magazine Publishing for her significant contributions. Her book, Lead by Example: An Insiders Look at How to Successfully Lead in Corporate America and Entrepreneurshipprovides practical guidance for women to succeed in corporate America and entrepreneurship, based on her own valuable experience. And most recently, Sheila became Dr. Sheila Robinson when she was awarded her Chief Learning Officer (CLO) Doctorate of Education at University of Pennsylvania.

We Are All Leaders

Lead-by-ExampleWhen Sheila wrote her book, she did it to share her journey, not understanding immediately that she had been developing leadership skills along the way. A question was presented to her once, “Are you born a leader or do you learn to be a leader?” She decided that it’s a bit of both. And in answering the question, she realized that we are all leaders, from administrators to CEOs. Her administrative assistant is the most phenomenal leader she knows and Sheila credits much of her success to her assistant.
Mothers are leaders who guide their children through behavior on the playground and at school.  Many women have a tendency to try to hold other women back when they try to be successful. Both Dr. Nancy and Sheila discuss how they confronted this behavior during their journeys. Sheila wonders if women have been so beaten down by society that we see ourselves as servants and can’t imagine being leaders. Her mission is to dispel the myths and help women see their best selves and their best potential for achieving their dreams.

Key to Advancing into Leadership- Mentorship

Sheila’s research demonstrated that one of the key elements to advancing is to build strategic relationships—in which mentorship, sponsorship and networking are at the core. She defines a mentor as being a person who agrees to share her expertise with another person for free. Since they aren’t being paid, the person being mentored needs to make it mutually beneficial for the mentor. Sheila lists several ways to make it a win-win relationship in this interview, but finally, she urges us to take the advice. No one wants to offer advice and see it go nowhere. She told a story about how she asked Dr. Maya Angelou what she could do for her, to which she replied, “Sheila, continue to do what you’re doing. That’s the greatest thing you can do for me.”

Women Helping Women—All of Us Working Together

Sheila credits her success, not to people who look like her, but instead acknowledges that her achievements come from the women and men from all races, cultures and backgrounds. That’s why she works so hard to educate and include everyone in the potential to be their best. Check out www.diversitywoman.com for more information about Sheila, her book, magazine and the 2016 The National Diversity National Women’s Leadership Council in Baltimore, Maryland, in October.
Listen to this interview to hear Sheila tell her own amazing story and Dr. Nancy’s and Sheila’s discussion about how women helping women and everyone working together can make anything possible.

Women-Helping-Women Movement Is All About Connecting

FACEBOOKFor Immediate Release
For a review copy of the book
or an interview with Dr. Nancy D. O’Reilly,
please use our contact page.
The Women-Helping-Women Movement Is All About Connecting. 
Here Are 11 Ways to Do It Better.
Making meaningful connections with other women can change your life (not to  mention the world). Problem is, many of us don’t know how—or where—to do it. Dr. Nancy D. O’Reilly offers 11 tips to help you improve your connecting skills.
Santa Barbara, CA (February 2015)—Competing with other women is out. Connecting with other women to share ideas, work together on projects, and offer support is in. The changes brought about by the global economy have made collaboration and innovation “must-have” skills, and the great news is that women tend to be naturals at them. And that, says licensed psychologist Dr. Nancy D. O’Reilly, is why the women-helping-women movement is really picking up steam.
“We’re making a shift to what I call ‘Connecting 2.0,’” says O’Reilly, who along with 19 other women, cowrote the new book Leading Women: 20 Influential Women Share Their Secrets to Leadership, Business, and Life (Adams Media, 2015, ISBN: 978-1-440-58417-6, $16.99, www.drnancyoreilly.com). “It’s more meaningful than the ‘mile-wide and inch-deep’ type of connecting we associate with social media. It’s based on sharing and co-creating, not self-interest. It’s authentic, it feels good, and it works.”

Expanding Women’s Network of Resources to Support Women

This deeper approach to connecting works so well, in fact, that we are creating an ever-expanding network of resources offering expertise and support to women in business, government, education, philanthropy, and other fields. The idea is not just to advance our careers and make money, but to make life itself richer, more exciting, and more creative.
“This is more than a trend; it’s a movement—and women are loving it,” says O’Reilly.  “More and more smart, amazing women are connecting to help their ‘sisters’ live their very best lives. These likeminded women are passionate about making the world a better place—so they are finding one another and building strong, supportive communities.”
The women-helping-women movement is nothing like the phony, self-serving, let’s-exchange-cards-and-move-on networking that most of us hate. Sure, connecting with other women does pay off in amazing ways, but the rewards flow organically from our “feminine strengths” and a genuine desire to make a difference in the lives of others.
You may be wondering, Where do I sign up? The answer is “everywhere.” This is not some exclusive club—it’s open to all women with passion, enthusiasm, and a yearning to live a richer, more fulfilling life and maybe even change the world. But O’Reilly knows you may not be used to thinking this way. That’s why she offers the following tips:

First things first: Aim for a good mix of online and face-to-face connecting.

It’s easy to send an email message, and it’s really easy to like, to share, to follow in the world of social media. That’s why so many women do it. (It’s easy to push a key or click a mouse after all.) And while there is nothing wrong with social media, it’s also no substitute for real-world human interaction. The women-helping-women movement depends on both types of connecting: virtual and face-to-face.
“If you’re burning up social media, consider taking an online contact offline,” she advises. “Tell her you’d love to meet her for lunch the next time she’s in town. Conversely, if you’re proudly ‘old school’ and are neglecting your social media presence, dive in. You really need a foot in both worlds.”

Join a new group that interests you and really attend the meetings. Make them a priority.

It doesn’t matter what activity it’s based on. This may be a book circle or a kayaking club or a community cause. What’s important is that you’re getting together with other women who share a common interest—and that you go to meetings and events often enough to let these strong connections develop.
“It’s the shared passion for the activity that generates the connections,” notes O’Reilly. “And those connections take on a life of their own. You may end up forging alliances, finding jobs, winning clients—even though that’s not the ‘purpose’ for the group.”

Get on a different team at work.

We tend to stick to our comfort zone. But shaking things up from time to time keeps you sharp and puts you in the path of exciting new people. When you work with women you don’t know on projects you’re unfamiliar with, you will learn, grow, and often discover vital new talents and interests.

Get involved in a philanthropic cause that speaks to your heart.

Women who care enough about others to volunteer their time, talents, and treasure are the kinds of women you want to meet. They tend to be “other-oriented” and want to make new connections, too. So whether your “cause” is homeless animals, kids with cancer, adult literacy, or clean oceans, get involved.
“I actually met the 19 women who cowrote the book through my Women Connect4Good, Inc., foundation,” she adds. “In fact, the book is living proof of the kind of collaboration that happens when women make connections based on their desire to serve.”

Think about what you need to learn. Seek out mentors who can help you learn it.

Let’s say you have a small catering company specializing in weddings, parties, and family reunions. You’d like to expand into the healthcare conference arena but know nothing about the field. You might reach out to someone who plans such conferences and offer to trade services—perhaps cater an upcoming event for free or for a greatly reduced price—in exchange for the chance to learn and get a foot in the door.
“You’re not asking for something for free,” notes O’Reilly. “You’re also bringing something to the table. Who knows: Her clients may love your fresh approach, and it could result in the two of you starting a whole new venture.”

Likewise, give back to women who need your expertise.

In other words, don’t just seek out mentors. Be a mentor to women who can benefit from your knowledge and experience. It’s “good karma” and it can pay off in unexpected ways.

Take a class. (And don’t just sit there; talk to your neighbor.)

Whether it’s continuing education for your job, a creative writing class at the local community college, or even a martial arts training session, actively pursue new knowledge and skills. This will bring new and interesting women into your life—women who, just by being there, show that they have a zest for life and learning.

Volunteer your speaking services.

Yes, yes, you hate public speaking. Many women do. But taking to the podium is a powerful way to get your voice heard, to build up your confidence, and of course to make new connections with those who hear you speak. And there are many civic and service organizations—like the Chamber of Commerce and Rotary Club—that need speakers.

Handpick five to ten powerful women in your community and ask them to participate in an event.

This might be a roundtable discussion that takes place at an industry conference or a community fundraiser, for example. And don’t think that busy, important women won’t have time for you, says O’Reilly.
“Remember, women love sharing stories, best practices, and ideas,” she says. “You might be surprised by how many will say yes.”

If you’re invited, go.

When someone invites you to an event or gathering—whether it’s an industry trade show, a party, or a hiking trip—go if you can. Yes, even if you’re tired, out-of-sorts, and feeling blah.
“Say yes if it’s remotely possible,” advises O’Reilly. “There are always reasons to say no and some of them are good reasons. But overall, life rewards action. Life rewards yes. The more times you say yes, the more connections you will make. The more connections you make, the richer and more creative your life will be.”

Set a goal to meet “X” new women per month.

Insert your own number, depending on your circumstances and personality. Hold yourself to this number (it will help greatly to keep track in a journal or calendar). If you take this metric seriously, you’ll figure out how to make it happen. And while meeting isn’t the same as connecting, it’s the essential first step.
“Let’s say your goal is to meet five new women this month, and it’s the last day of the month and you have two to go,” says O’Reilly. “You can always pop into the spin class at your gym, or maybe go to an open house or political rally. While you’re there, of course, strike up conversations with at least two women and introduce yourself.” Voilà! You’ve met your goal!
While women are naturally good at connecting, it doesn’t happen automatically, notes O’Reilly. We really do have to make an effort.
“Most of us are so busy and overwhelmed that we just don’t make it a priority to connect with other women,” she says. “We really do have to be deliberately purposeful about it. The benefits of connecting with other women are incredible, so we owe it to ourselves—and each other—to make it happen.”

# # #

About the Author:
Nancy D. O’Reilly, PsyD, is an author of Leading Women: 20 Influential Women Share Their Secrets to Leadership, Business, and Life and urges women to connect to help each other create a better world. As a licensed psychologist, motivational speaker, and women empowerment expert, O’Reilly helps women create the satisfying and purposeful lives they want to benefit themselves, their families, and their communities. To accomplish this, she devotes her energies to fulfilling the mission of the Women Connect4Good, Inc., foundation, which benefits from her writing and speaking services. O’Reilly is the founder of Women Connect4Good, Inc., and for seven years she has interviewed inspiring women for online podcasts available on her website.
For more information, please visit www.drnancyoreilly.com and follow the author on Facebook and Twitter.
About the Book:
Leading Women: 20 Influential Women Share Their Secrets to Leadership, Business, and Life (Adams Media, 2015, ISBN: 978-1-440-58417-6, $16.99, www.drnancyoreilly.com) is available at bookstores nationwide and from online booksellers.

Empower Yourself | Create A Network of Women

Pamela Ryckman, journalist, speaker and authorSome people call it a new movement; others say it’s just the way women have always been. Pamela Ryckman tells their stories in her new book, Stiletto Network: Inside the Women’s Power Circles That Are Changing the Face of Business.
While researching an article for “The NY Times,” Pamela attended a women’s conference of about 50 of the most powerful women in business from around the country. But they weren’t behaving like corporate CEO’s and Presidents. They were kissing and hugging each other and asking about their kids and they weren’t dressed in the dorky pinstripe suits.
They were women who were comfortable being women: feminine, affectionate, approachable women. But it didn’t stop there. Pamela found groups like this all over the country from all areas of life. Mixed groups of mommy entrepreneurs were having dinner with corporate middle-management. A broad-spectrum of working women, some just beginning their careers and others successful business leaders, were networking in the most personal way—friendship.

Today’s Women Networks

Pamela and Dr. Nancy discuss the sisterhood and how they both have seen 5 or 6 women plan and launch the most incredible projects in just a few minutes and (most important) have a lot of fun doing it. Pamela said that is what sets stiletto networks apart. They exist because they are fun. It’s not like the women networks within corporations. While those have their place, these networks are for self-improvement and empowerment. And because that is the goal, business and personal life are integrated in the relationships among their members.
Pamela equates it to carpooling and sharing driving duties with other mothers. If one woman is founding a business, another will step in to help, sending her clients to get her started. The same relationship skills that have been used since our days as hunter-gatherers work today. It’s natural for women to nurture others. In business this becomes a powerful force for everyone’s benefit. In fact, Pamela says that she has charted billions of dollars of transactions and corporate boards being founded and funded through these groups of women friends.

How to Create a Network

Pamela gives advice about how to start your own stiletto network. It’s easy. Invite a friend with similar goals and dreams to dinner. Talk about other friends who might like to come. Then build relationships and help one another where you can. Pamela says maybe it took women being in the workforce for 40 years for this phenomenon to occur. Women are finally realizing that they don’t have to play like the boys in business. Building trusting relationships is far more powerful than trying to out-do each other.
Read Pamela’s wonderful book about this incredible new movement and check out her blog for up-to-date business insights.
 

Related Articles

Seeking Collaboration with Other Women’s Initiatives

Calling Women’s Initiatives: Let’s Share What We’ve Learned

We often hear, “Do not reinvent the wheel.” I agree: there’s no time for that. It’s better to share what we have learned with other women so we can make positive changes more quickly.

That has always been my mission. It continues to be the goal with our Women Connect4Good, Inc. Foundation. Along the path we have found so many smart amazing women to collaborate and partner with, especially to help women hear their call to action: to empower all women and change our world for the better.

We believe that we can connect and serve more women and families when we join forces with other women. Women Connect4Good is a new networking and sharing tool to help us do this. Please tell us about your important programs that currently serve women and your communities. We will share your information to help others develop programs to serve their own areas.

One such program that I’ve been personally involved with is Female Leaders in Philanthropy. FLiP is the Women’s Initiative of United Way of the Ozarks. FLIP is called to equip women with the work skills and life skills that enable them to better care for themselves and their families. The message and mission of FLiP is to help women transition into their communities and “pay it forward.” We also help fund a Backpack Program that feeds hungry school children on weekends. We are all in this together and if just one of us suffers and is limited in some way, it affects all of us. Read about FLiP programs here.

Giving of our time, talents and treasures to serve others is a privilege and something we can all do. Working together for good is also a great way to have fun, make new friends, and build your business, too.

Please hear your name being called right now. Do you hear it?

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