Women Helping Women

Discovering How Women Can Support Women

Women Support Women

Paige Oxendine

Paige Oxendine is a walking, talking example of what happens when you live each day to do your best. She credits her parents with instilling in her great values such as contributing to and being part of the community, doing your best, and working hard. Paige took these lessons to heart in her school and professional life to help entrepreneurs with additional support for women.

This articulate young millennial began her journey to leadership during four years of competitive high school debate, where she learned how to develop various communication styles. These enabled her “to communicate with people who may hold different viewpoints from your own and still have a rational and reasonable conversation.” Paige moved on to college, participated in student government, and was elected Student Body President at Missouri State University while achieving her degree in public relations and socio-political communication. But she specifically credits participation in the Sue Shear Institute for Women in Public Life among the formative events and people that gave her the background and inspiration to pursue community service.

In the 10 years since graduation, Paige’s community work has included Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce managing a team of young professionals under 40. She is currently employed as Program Coordinator for Missouri State’s e-Factory, a business incubator, workspace, network environment, training center and more.

Helping Women Helps Everyone

Like many of her generation, Paige believes in doing well while doing good. The idea that “a rising tide floats all boats” is at the heart of her approach to economic development, and she knows that helping women helps everyone.  She works to create programs and an environment that will inspire entrepreneurs to create “the next big thing” that will help everyone in the community.

Transforming the biases we have about what leadership looks like is a really big thing. While participating in the Shear Institute she met women who make policy in the state of Missouri, and debated the issues they face as members of government. Paige told Dr. Nancy that people still envision the U.S. President as a man, a perspective we need to change in ourselves and in the next generation before a woman has a hope of occupying the Oval Office.

Rosie Helps Women Claim Their Power

As told in the final chapter of Dr. Nancy’s latest book  In This Together, Paige collaborated with Rachel Anderson to create Rosie, a women’s networking group in Springfield, Missouri. Paige said they were inspired to do this when they noticed that leadership in the region was overwhelmingly “pale and male.” The same six women served on all the boards that had women, and they were overworked because they were afraid if they said no, there would be no women at all. With the help of The Women’s Foundation based in Kansas City, they got a grant for initial funding, and used their community contacts and relationships to start a network that is now 1,000 strong.

Getting Men As Allies and Advocates

Their goal for Rosie was to create a free database of information from local women about their experiences, their interests and their skill sets, so they could link women with speaking opportunities, board openings and jobs outside of their workplace or industry. They expected 60 people at the Rosie launch party but more than 200 showed up. Men wanted to participate too, so they launched Brosie  for awesome men who wanted to become allies and advocates.  Two-and-a-half years later, the momentum continues and Rosie has an exciting future serving women in the community.

Listen to this conversation between Dr. Nancy and Paige for more personal stories and advice on working together to create opportunities for ourselves and others. Hear more about how these two amazing young women started Rosie and check out the website for more wisdom on helping women by helping our communities.

Order Dr. Nancy’s new book or pick it up at your book store

The story of Rosie appears in Nancy’s new book, In This Together: How Successful Women Support Each Other In Work and Life, as an inspiring example of how you can develop your own community network. Read the thoughts, inspiration, and stories from 40 successful women across a variety of careers—from authors to actresses, CEOs and professors—encouraging women to support each other in the workplace and in life. Learn about action plans for working together to break free from the binds of gender inequality. Buy a copy for yourself and gifts for your friends.

Creating Social Change With and For Women

Sarah Acer founded Align Communication & Creative as an experiment to see if she could work on projects that created social change with women who shared her values to do the same. Ten working moms, many of them young mothers, left their big brand careers to work on projects that aligned with their personal values while also allowing them to control their time, and balance their life and careers. Four years later, the women-owned collective has built a new kind of agency — one that includes the perks, projects and people they always daydreamed about—and where they can challenge the status quo, solve complex problems and drive social change.

At 14, Sarah began her first initiative to create social change when she joined the Truth Campaign, the nationwide tobacco education and cessation program to stop the epidemic of teenage smoking. Watching her grandmother progress from macular degeneration, breast cancer to lung cancer and still be unable to stop smoking enlightened her to the power of a harmful habit. 20 years later, Sarah is still involved with the campaign, but has broadened her scope to include big business that is also good business with an emphasis on those serving under-served communities.

Solve for XX

In 2018 Sarah co-founded Solve for XX , an organization set up to solve issues that impact people with XX chromosomes (women). With a grant from The State Department, through the Nelson Mandela Exchange Program, a young African leader is matched with American entrepreneurs. Sarah and her partner, Kristen Romaine were matched with – an equally amazing woman from Uganda who runs Women in Tech Uganda. They collaborated originally to help Women in Tech run more efficiently.  But the pilot program they developed went much further..

Solve for XX became a 24-hour hackathon, during which participants were trained in business skills, like writing resumes, applying for jobs, and creating a business plan, and then matched with mentors to guide them. During the final 12 hours, participants were divided into teams to identify and develop solutions for the problems women face in their communities. In Kampala, Uganda, where this hackathon took place, early marriage and pregnancy tie women to a way of life that keeps them stuck in poverty. Business plans emerged from the participants, which were rewarded with microfinancing for businesses that can transform lives. Sarah said the microfinance part of the program was unintentional, but when they were presented with pitches that only required $100 to run a business for six months, they provided the funding to proceed. This leg up helps women help their families and ultimately their entire community, country, and even the world. More Solve for XX hackathons are planned for Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, Detroit, Michigan and Catania, Italy. If you’d like to volunteer, mentors are needed via Skype.

Millennials Moving into Leadership in 2020

The future is here, and the first group to outnumber baby boomers is becoming half of the workforce. As one of them, Sarah’s own passion for pursuing a life of service places her in the majority. Sarah said that most millennials care less about the monetary rewards of salaries and more about workplace culture, family leave and other benefits that support healthy and happy lifestyles. Because they have entered the workforce in such numbers they are also moving into leadership. That means they will command large budgets and make decisions to support their values as they become middle and upper level managers.

Healthier cultures in the workplace is one part of Sarah’s thesis for her doctoral dissertation. She is also exploring how implicit bias holds women back from achieving full parity. We all have biases and she said the first step is to recognize them so we can work on correcting the way we perceive ourselves and others. The key to getting women in top management is getting a woman in top management. She likens it to the chicken and egg syndrome. Bias, from both men and women, keeps them from getting in the door. Nancy added one of her favorite sayings, “When you get through the door, take three women with you.”

Listen to this conversation for more of Sarah’s personal story and her ideas on how we can help women achieve parity and full equality. Check out her website to learn more about Align Communication and Creative. And be sure to check out Solve for XX to see how you can help women help themselves and their families transform their lives.

Order Dr. Nancy’s new book or pick it up at your book store

Sarah’s viewpoint about millennials in the workplace and research about eliminating bias also appear in Dr. Nancy’s new book, In This Together: How Successful Women Support Each Other In Work and Life, along with thoughts, inspiration, and stories from 40 successful women across a variety of careers—from authors to actresses, CEOs and professors—encouraging women to support each other in the workplace and in life. Learn about action plans on how all women can work together to break free from the binds of gender inequality. Then remember to get your copy – and gifts for your friends.

 

 

 

 

Use Your Special Talents and Speak Up

Teaching women to use special talents and speak up

Kathy Caprino

Kathy Caprino helps women discover their special talents and learn how they can use them to light up the world with the career of their dreams. Once a successful, but unhappy corporate vice president, Kathy had to have her own crisis and breakthrough to found Ellia Comunications, Inc., and become the international career coach, author and speaker she is today. Now living her own dream, Kathy is helping others break through their power gaps, find their bravery and seize opportunities for successful, purposeful lives.

Who Are You?

Before a coaching session, Kathy said that she gives women and men 11 pages of questions to answer on her career path assessment. The first question asks who you are and what makes you special, and Kathy is astounded that women cannot answer that question. She remarks that she couldn’t do it either 30 years ago when she had her own career and life crisis. But she stresses that you must be able to answer that question before you can begin to do what you truly want and live the satisfying fulfilling life on the inside as well as outside. She calls this process “Finding Brave.” She has named her podcast after the process and interviews guests who have found their own bravery to help them work through their own special talents.

Power Gaps

Power gaps are those aspects of you that allow you to stay stuck doing things with people that make you unhappy. These gaps cause you to put up with toxic work environments, less pay than you deserve, sexual harassment, and all sorts of negativity that stops you from making the contributions that will fulfill your life’s purpose. Kathy wrote an article identifying and explaining all seven power gaps for Forbes , the first of which is “Not Recognizing Your Special Talents, Abilities and Accomplishments.”

Kathy said that when you close your power gaps, problems seem to dissolve of their own accord. You find that you will no longer allow that overbearing boss to scare you into obedience or hide your true opinions to keep the peace in difficult situations. You take the credit you deserve, gather support from influential associates and define yourself from a brave present-tense perspective.

Insights from Therapist Training

Dr. Nancy and Kathy share more insights from their mutual training in psychotherapy. Kathy said many of us still carry childhood trauma around with us and allow it to hold us back. Even seemingly supportive parental behavior can steer us in a different path from where we need to go. Listen to more of her personal story, how she discovered her own special talent, and learn more about her book, which is due out in 2020. Check out her website for more about her programs, her blog, speaking, events and personal growth resources, and to access her career path assessment to discover your own talents.

Order Dr. Nancy’s new book or pick it up at your book store

Kathy’s insights also appear in Dr. Nancy’s new book, In This Together: How Successful Women Support Each Other In Work and Life, along with thoughts, inspiration, and stories from 40 successful women across a variety of careers—from authors to actresses, CEOs and professors—encouraging women to support each other in the workplace and in life. Learn about action plans on how all women can work together to break free from the binds of gender inequality. Then remember to get your copy – and gifts for your friends.

 

 

 

 

 

What Adolescents Think About Gender Inequality

Gender Equality

Cheryl Benton

As a successful NYC advertising professional, Cheryl Benton knows a thing or two about creating media images that create public perception, which is why she was disturbed when she saw a survey that reported US adolescent girls still perceived the #1 value for girls and women is their appearance. No matter how hard we’ve tried to change that viewpoint, girls are pressured about their looks more than ever before with the prevalence of social media and a culture that is stuck in the midst of gender inequality.

To get that needle to move, Cheryl says that we need to educate everyone. And that begins with everyone reading Dr. Nancy’s new book, In This Together. Cheryl says that every college campus should have it and every corporation should make it required reading. Changing people’s perception and giving a voice to women is Cheryl’s passion. She began her successful international media platform, The Three Tomatoes.com, when she began to feel invisible in her 50’s. She saw that advertisers were not speaking to her or her friends, and she decided that they could just talk to one another. Her little group of 60 people grew among women from coast to coast and around the world found messages that resonated with them also. As Head Tomato, Cheryl continues to look for ways to empower women and girls and her newest volunteer effort was to found the NYC Leadership Council for Plan International USA.

Plan International Lifting Girls Out of Poverty

Cheryl explains that Plan International has been fighting for children’s rights (mostly in developing countries) since 1937. More recently, they have realized the importance of lifting girls out of poverty. Her role with the NYC Leadership Council is to help raise awareness and funding for the “Because I’m a Girl” program. In the spring of 2018, Plan International sponsored a survey of 1,006 adolescent girls and boys about gender equality, which resulted in the report, “The State of Gender Equality for US Adolescents.”

Although 95% of teens between 10 and 19 years old believed in gender equality, there was more confusion about what that meant. Most (54%) were more comfortable with women continuing traditional roles. But there was quite a difference between boys’ and girls’ perspectives on the current status of inequality. Cheryl summarized the difference in perspectives: 21% of girls thought there is currently gender equality, while 41% of boys think there is. And over 51% of girls think it’s a problem, contrasted with only 19% of boys who think it’s an issue. Similar findings among women and men bear out that this doesn’t change much with age. However, Cheryl believes the onus is on the school systems who have no curriculum to educate children and teens about genders and sex education, and the media of course, which plays a huge role perpetuating cultural norms. And Dr. Nancy added that parents also have a responsibility to guide their children, help them see through the corrected gender lens at home, provide role models and mentor them toward achieving their goals.

Great Messages from In This Together

When Dr. Nancy asked Cheryl to share her pearls of wisdom, Cheryl started quoting things she had underlined in Dr. Nancy’s new book. One powerful line Cheryl said she noted was how are feminine traits are actually our power tools. If we perceive them that way, companies will also begin to see them as powerful assets to the business. Another piece of advice she thought was important is, “Ask for what you want.” She noted that men are so much better at negotiating than women. She urges her daughter to go in and ask for that raise, telling her how to point out what she has done for the company and why she deserves it.

Ultimately Cheryl says, the most important thing is to believe in yourself. That core belief will help us stand up to those who would tear us down. For today’s women, she sees social media as especially challenging for younger women. You have to be really strong to stand up to the naysayers and those who thrive on tearing others down.  That’s why she says the power of girl friends is so important. She hearkens back to In This Together in its advice to build your council or team of supporters to amplify your voice.

Lift As You Go

Listen to this great conversation for more information and great advice from these two Leading Women co-authors. And check out The Three Tomatoes.com website for what to do in NYC, LA and San Francisco, plus great make-over and fashion advice ,and how to buy Cheryl’s books, Can You See Us Now: A Novel for Grownups and Martini Wisdom: and Other Midlife Musings from The Three Tomatoes, must-reads for tomatoes everywhere.

Order Dr. Nancy’s new book or pick it up at your book store

Read the great advice that Cheryl mentioned and others in Dr. Nancy’s new book, In This Together: How Successful Women Support Each Other In Work and Life, along with thoughts, inspiration, and stories from 40 successful women across a variety of careers—from authors to actresses, CEOs and professors—encouraging women to support each other in the workplace and in life. Learn about action plans on how all women can work together to break free from the binds of gender inequality. Then remember to get your copy – and gifts for your friends.

Do You Allow Money to Define Your Self-Worth?

Kathy LeMay

Kathy LeMay is an expert fundraiser and has helped raise over $175 million for social change. Yet she is the first to admit that everyone has a complicated relationship with money. People either think they don’t have enough money, or they feel guilty for having too much. Kathy says that she was raised in a struggling mill town in the 70’s. Her family, supported by a very strong mother, survived with the help of others. As an international philanthropist and founder of Raising Change, Kathy has worked with a wide range of people, from those in abject poverty to people who own multiple homes throughout the world. She knows that fortunes can disappear in an instant and that those fortunes have nothing to do with your self-worth as a human being. Yet she struggled with that issue about herself when she found that her own self-confidence and feelings of self-worth were tied to her achievements and successes, not who she is as a person.

In her self-reflection she asked herself if she lost everything, what would she have? She looked at the qualities that she valued: would she be less compassionate, have less empathy, still be thoughtful, show up and listen to her friends? Money did not define any of those qualities. Now Kathy says her attitude about money is more detached like looking at a painting that someone else painted. She is no longer affected by adjustments in her bank account. And her new perspective about her own self-worth has helped her create a more successful business.

Your Worth Is Based on the Concept, “Because You Are Here, You Matter.”

Kathy says she chose a career seeking significance rather than success and the people she has met, mentored and worked with through the years have helped her become the person she is today. Kathy began her career at 23 by volunteering to help women in war-torn Bosnia. She marvels in this conversation with Dr. Nancy about how she thought at such a young age that she could help victims of genocide, but she did help by using those qualities that give her the humanity and empathy to reach out, listen to others, and witness their plight. At the core of it is that women have far more courage than we think we do. When we listen to that small voice inside us, we naturally reach out to support others.

Next Step: In 2019 Completely Transform Fundraising Around the World

Kathy has trained hundreds, perhaps thousands of people to become social entrepreneurs, raise money and work for social change. But this past year, she developed the foundation for her next goal: to reach “the first thousand fundraisers throughout the world” with an online master class. She taught the master class to 70 people last year. These courageous people inspired her to widen the scope and develop a digital version. She promises that the at home instruction will open doors for you that you never imagined and enable you to become one of the top fundraisers in the world. Check out her website, RaisingChange.com, to see the video about it and get on the mailing list to get ready to change the world.

Listen to learn more about this amazing class and Kathy’s advice about how to defend what you feel most passionate about, and more of her insights and powerful stories about self-discovery and what defines self-worth.

Order Dr. Nancy’s new book or pick it up at your book store

Kathy’s guidance about listening also appears in Dr. Nancy’s new book, In This Together: How Successful Women Support Each Other In Work and Life, along with thoughts, inspiration, and stories from 40 successful women across a variety of careers—from authors to actresses, CEOs and professors—encouraging women to support each other in the workplace and in life. Learn about action plans on how all women can work together to break free from the binds of gender inequality. Then remember to get your copy – and gifts for your friends.

Working Together In A United Team Creates Extraordinary Power

Working Together In A United Team Creates Extraordinary Power

Dr. Sheila Robinson

Dr. Sheila Robinson says her experience working together with a united team of women inspired her to found and publish Diversity Woman Magazine and create the Diversity Women’s Business Leadership Conference. That team united women from Asia, South America, and North America  to create the Lycra® brand for DuPont, and brought together a sisterhood of diverse races, cultures and backgrounds. She said working together like that in one location generates a synergy and extraordinary power that is indescribable.

Dr. Sheila’s purpose is to educate women that it’s okay for us to look different and come from different places.  We all want many of the same things. We want a healthy happy family, opportunities and to be safe and successful. None of us will get anywhere if we undermine each other. When we put aside our differences and unite, we are amazed at what we can accomplish together.

Never Give Up on Your Dream

Dr. Nancy mentioned how much she enjoyed seeing the young women and men who attended the Diversity Women’s Leadership Conference for the first time. She learned so much about what inclusion and sisterhood really mean. Dr. Sheila said that she was grateful for the praise and that feedback from newcomers makes the work worthwhile. She stressed that it is not easy work to do, but this time, she was able to bring more female CEO-level professionals from major corporations than ever before. It has always been her dream to bring the c-suite women together with those just starting out to show them what is possible and that they can be leaders too.

She recounted a story from a CFO speaker at this year’s conference, who said, “This is part of my ministry. I have things on my desk that have to be done, but I have to do this.” It’s that kind of dedication to helping other women that will escalate the equality needed in women’s leadership.  Dr. Nancy described a chart she saw at this year’s conference: 65% of female CEOs said they achieved their success because someone told them they could do it. These relationships between women supporting and mentoring other women give both the mentor and mentoree the drive and spirit to accomplish their goals. Sheila said her own mother pushed her to do new things and women like Dr. Johnetta Cole and Dr. Maya Angelou, said, “Don’t stop the work.” These women told her she was on the right journey.

Be Courageous and Don’t Let People in Power Derail You from Your Goals

Dr. Sheila incorporated two themes at this year’s Diversity Women’s Conference. The first one was to be courageous, no matter what. The second was a saying that she has been repeating to herself for years. What people say to you is a reflection of who they are and what you say to others is a reflection of who you are. If they say something harmful to you, it’s up to you to remember that it’s only their opinion and does not really reflect you, unless you let it. She told a story about a supervisor at one company she worked for who told her she would never be anything but an administrative assistant in that company. She immediately thought, “This is not the company for me.” She would never have become Dr. Sheila Robinson, named one of the “50 Top Women in Magazine Publishing” if she had accepted that supervisor’s limited assessment of her.

Define Yourself as a Leader First — And Other Wonderful Advice

Listen to this interview to find out why Dr. Sheila says all women are leaders, and how she says to change your perspective about who you think you are. First, identify yourself as a leader, then as a woman, then as a woman of color or ethnicity, and so on. That way you keep any limiting biases from distracting you from your course. Check out her website and save the dates, Nov. 13 & 14, 2019, to attend next year’s Diversity Women’s Business Leadership Conference to find out in person how truly powerful coming together with like minded women and men can be.

Order Dr. Nancy’s new book or pick it up at your book store

Sheila’s stories and guidance also appear in Dr. Nancy’s new book, In This Together: How Successful Women Support Each Other In Work and Life, along with thoughts, inspiration, and stories from 40 successful women across a variety of careers—from authors to actresses, CEOs and professors—encouraging women to support each other in the workplace and in life. Learn about action plans on how all women can work together to break free from the binds of gender inequality. Then remember to get your copy – and gifts for your friends.

What Are The Three Most Powerful Words?

Award-Winning Journalist

Michele Weldon

Award-winning journalist Michele Weldon used to ask her students at Northwestern University what the most powerful three words are. No, they are not I love you, as many would have guessed. They are “I don’t know.” This was how she taught the future reporters the importance of finding answers by asking questions. She contrasts it to women being reticent and fearful of seeming less-than when they don’t know the answer. Instead, Michele says that while saying “I don’t know” does communicate vulnerability, these three powerful words also present an opportunity to learn.

Stake Your Claim and Own Your Own Power

Women are too often reluctant to claim their own power. Michele noted she has met women who won big awards—for example sharing a Nobel Prize or winning a MacArthur Genius Grant Award ––yet didn’t mention it in their introductory bios because they feared being called a braggart or worse. In her work as Take the Lead’s editorial director, she regularly urges women to claim and use their own power. She said that it’s important for women to look at their inclinations, instincts and personal work-life experience to decide what strengths they can develop to achieve their goals, instead of focusing on what they need to apologize for.

Dr. Nancy noted that she often hears a woman say, “I’m sorry” (and talked about her response when she hears herself saying it). In her book In This Together she talks about our hidden biases, including how we’re stuck thinking of men as leaders and women as followers, when nothing can be further from the truth. Women lead their children and their husbands every day, but don’t define it as leadership. Women make the best leaders when they lead as women. She likes a quote from an unknown source, “Be the leader you want to be lead by.” You know who those people are, she says. “They inspire you; they support you; they protect you; they lift you up.” There is no better leader than an authentic role model.

Gloria Steinem—Michele’s Professional Role Model

This interview was recorded early in December, so Michele and Nancy talked about seeing one another at the upcoming play, “Gloria: A Life.” The performance was a fundraiser for Take the Lead and featured Gloria Steinem personally leading the after-play discussion. The play can be seen at the Daryl Roth Theater through March 31, 2019.

Michele said that Gloria Steinem was admirable for not just superficially performing as a feminist, but taking actions in support of feminism for 60 years ever since she was at Smith College. When Michele was a young journalism student, she followed Gloria’s career and found her to be a source of wisdom and inspiration with a graceful way of speaking about really profound ideas. She especially appreciates the way Gloria talks about the broader aspects of life beyond women’s rights and equality to include the necessity to honor humanity and her hard work against domestic abuse and child abuse globally. Both Michele and Dr. Nancy were excited to learn Gloria’s perspective about this moment in history and where we’re going.

Hear More Stories and Read Michele’s Blogs and Books

Listen to this interview for more stories and information about Michele’s upcoming new book, Act Like You’re Having a Good Time: Essays on Life, Work and Meaning, her Op Ed project that is giving a voice to people from disadvantaged groups around the world, and her editorial post at Take the Lead. And check out her website to find out more, order books or contact her for a keynote address.

 

Order Dr. Nancy’s new book or pick it up at your book store

Michele’s ideas and advice also appear in Dr. Nancy’s new book, In This Together: How Successful Women Support Each Other In Work and Life, along with thoughts, inspiration, and stories from 40 successful women across a variety of careers—from authors to actresses, CEOs and professors—encouraging women to support each other in the workplace and in life. Learn about action plans on how all women can work together to break free from the binds of gender inequality. Then remember to get your copy – and gifts for your friends.

Creating Powerful Magic from Working in Sisterhood

Co-Founder, Speaker, Producer, On Air Personality See Jane Do

Elisa Parker

As a self-proclaimed media maven, speaker and visionary for women and social justice, Elisa Parker has co-founded several organizations to support women, including the award-winning multimedia program “See Jane Do,” the women’s conference Passion into Action, Indivisible Women,  50 Women Can Change the World in Media & Entertainment, and 100 Women Change Hollywood.  Elisa defines her passion as “co-creating a coalition through sisterhood and inclusivity.” There’s a magic that happens when women come together from industries and environments where they seem invisible and powerless. The women in these groups feel the support of the sisterhood and say things like, “I feel like I can take off my shield and that I’m in a safe place where I can say what I think.”

Elisa always knew that she would be a creator and advocate  for others in a social justice capacity, and that she would use the power of storytelling to do it. In elementary school, when the movie, “Nine to Five” came out, she copied the words from the opening song and handed them out to all of her classmates. It was the first step of many to support women using their voices.

The Birth of See Jane Do and Elisa’s Motto, “Don’t Be A Dick. Be a Jane.”

When Elisa moved from the Bay Area, where she worked  in the corporate world, to a rural neighborhood in California, she realized that she had left all that our society values in terms of money and position. She had to define her own value in a different way. See Jane Do was born from her social justice roots, to provide a platform for her two young daughters and other women to speak out.

See Jane Do is a grant-funded multi-media platform that features “everyday women doing extraordinary things” using the power of story to create positive change. Broadcast weekly on  KVMR and 50/50 Hollywood, Elisa has interviewed amazing women ranging from Lily Tomlin to Gloria Steinem. The platform partners with others to further amplify initiatives, such as The Women’s March, The Representation Project and many others.

50 Women Can Change the World in Media and Entertainment

After becoming a Leadership Ambassador with Take the Lead, Elisa partnered with Tabby Biddle to create gender parity through 50 Women Can Change the World in Media and Entertainment. She said that even though we hear there aren’t any women directors, producers and writers, that simply isn’t true. There are a lot of women in media and entertainment, they just aren’t recognized and can’t get funding in an industry she described as a toxic masculine environment. By creating the cohort of diverse women from all aspects of media and entertainment, the 50 Women  Can initiative engaged their collective power by bringing them together and providing tools to access their power to become leaders in this vast industry. Elisa says it’s extremely important since media and entertainment is a reflection of our society and affects how we see ourselves and teach our children to see themselves. Dr. Nancy adds that it’s impossible to learn how to do something if you can’t see someone else doing it.

Learn More about The Magic of Women Coming Together

Listen to the interview to hear Elisa’s stories about how women working together are getting more opportunities by sharing resources and helping each other by working together.  Also listen to See Jane Do and check out other resources on the website—lots of wisdom and advice from everyday women doing extraordinary things. Elisa urges anyone who needs a connection to reach out to contact her on her  website or  on Facebook.

Order Dr. Nancy’s new book – Available Everywhere January 8, 2019

Elisa called Dr. Nancy’s new book “a game changer.”  Find out why and order your copy (and gifts for your friends) of In This Together: How Successful Women Support Each Other In Work and Life–thoughts, advice, and stories from 40 successful women across a variety of careers—from authors to actresses, CEOs and professors—encouraging women to support each other in the workplace and in life. Learn about action plans on how all women can work together to break free from the binds of gender inequality.

How to Help One Woman a Day

President of Selling in a SKIRT

Judy Hoberman

As a bestselling author and President of Selling in a SKIRT, Judy Hoberman’s goal is to help one woman a day. Her newest book, Walking on the Glass Floor explains that once women have crashed through the glass ceiling, they are walking on the glass floor and have a responsibility to help other women do the same. So how does she help women? asked Dr. Nancy in this interview. Judy said that she listens and pays attention to what they say. When women (or men) are authentic and generous—two of the key tools required for good leadership—they know instinctively what another person needs to hear. She tells the story of one such encounter, where the woman was incredulous about how Judy helped her in the exact way she needed.

Stepping Out of Our Comfort Zone Helps Women Advance

Judy’s career and life have been shaped by her father telling her that girls didn’t do certain things. The limitations he placed on her made her determined to do exactly what girls weren’t supposed do. As a result, she found herself working in jobs that were held by men with no female role models available to help her. She feels that working in male-dominated industries was a good experience because she had to learn to do things for herself and ask for support when she needed it. When she finally met a woman who could guide her to become a more successful business entrepreneur, it was so amazingly helpful, she realized that was exactly what she wanted to do for other women.

Do Not Let Others’ Preconceived Ideas or Your Own Biases Hold You Back

Both Judy and Dr. Nancy share ideas why more women haven’t stepped up to be leaders in the past. That’s changing. The 2018 midterm election saw more women running and being elected than ever before. Still, those who do step up are questioned when they have a baby or choose a life path that removes them from their careers. Women — and men — have mental tapes playing that reflect the lessons taught throughout our lives—like what girls are and are not supposed to be and do. We have allowed those beliefs to limit our aspirations and choices, but we can rewrite them as we pursue our goals and rightful share of leadership positions.

“Women Want to be Treated Equally, Not Identically”

Judy’s new training, “Empowering Equal, Not Identical Leadership” is based on the key concepts in her best-selling new book. Focusing on the challenges and opportunities in today’s workplaces that affect the success and retention of the employees and the business itself requires leaders to reflect on themselves. The top three qualities required, Judy said, are:

  • Authenticity
  • Courage
  • Generosity

She finds it rewarding to watch the students in her trainings. Some learn so much about themselves they are moved to tears. It is a different experience for everyone, of course, but good leadership starts with the leader being acutely aware of ways to support and champion other women at work.

Learn More about The Importance of Supporting Women

Judy shares more fascinating stories from her TED Talk and business experience. Listen to this interview to hear more and check out her website to learn how helping just one woman a day can expand exponentially to help millions of women, as each woman helps another in turn.

Order Dr. Nancy’s new book — 54% discount expires soon

Judy’s ideas also appear in Dr. Nancy’s new book, In This Together: How Successful Women Support Each Other In Work and Life, along with thoughts, advice, and stories from 40 successful women across a variety of careers—from authors to actresses, CEOs and professors—encouraging women to support each other in the workplace and in life. Learn about action plans on how all women can work together to break free from the binds of gender inequality. Then remember to order your copy – and gifts for your friends.

How to Help Women To Be More Powerful

Linda Rendleman

Linda Rendleman is the ultimate supporter of women’s work and lives and breathes her daily mantra, “Be the miracle in your own life.” She has won numerous awards for her writing and speaking, including, “The Torchbearer Award,” the highest award is given to a woman by her home state of Indiana for making a significant difference in the lives of women everywhere. Her reach stretches to Kenya, where her Women Like Us Foundation launched The Women’s Micro-Enterprise Program, which helps women survivors of sex trafficking or domestic abuse gain a sense of community through which they can help each other acquire new skills and tools to earn their livings. In Los Angeles, Rendleman’s foundation has established a similar mentoring program for women survivors of sex trafficking, homelessness or domestic violence, called Women Like Us Achieve, which she hopes to expand throughout the U.S.

Tend and Befriend Is Linda’s In This Together FAV

Linda stressed how excited she is about the ideas she read in Dr. Nancy’s new book In This Together. She and Dr. Nancy have walked similar paths in their advocacy for women (since the days when women couldn’t get credit cards in their own name or birth control if they weren’t married) and she feels a tremendous reward at the momentum that is building for women. In reading about how women’s natural inclination in times of crisis is to “tend and befriend” instead of fight or flight, Linda said it expresses perfectly how she feels about women supporting other women. The mission of her Women Like Us Foundation is to support other women’s leadership, which forms the core of all her efforts and is the reason she co-produced the powerful documentary “Women Like Us. Three Journeys. One Mission. To Change the World.”  The film chronicles three women’s journeys facing adversity, growth, and evolution, and offers inspiration from powerful role models around the world.

Mothers and Daughters Support Women’s Empowerment Together

Linda’s daughter Catt Sadler recently quit her high-profile celebrity job at E-Entertainment when they refused to pay her a salary equivalent to that of her male co-host who was doing half the work at twice the pay. Besides writing a book about her own journey, Catt has joined Linda to speak to groups within the Time’s Up movement in support of women’s equality. Linda talked about how thrilling it is to work together with her daughter on the same initiative. Dr. Nancy told of her own pleasure speaking with her daughter Ragan in programs for women. It takes “in this together” to a new level when women from different generations share their own perspectives and work to increase women’s leadership.

Creating Solutions Through Women Like Us

Linda’s three books in the Women Like Us series tell stories and provide advice to help women recognize their leadership potential, learn why it is important for them to lead, and to become more powerful.

In her upcoming salon in Los Angeles early in 2019, a panel will discuss sex trafficking. Linda said her ambassadors have dubbed it a “hackathon,” which means the roundtable discussion will focus on finding solutions that communities can realistically enact to solve their sex trafficking problem. Linda has found that there is no community that is immune to the problem. It literally is everywhere.  Initiatives work to fix both sides of the problem: the high demand from sex customers and those who profit by enslaving others.

Find out more about how WomenLikeUs.org is raising funds for women’s gender equality and social justice initiatives, including opportunities to help in your own community. Listen to this podcast for more inspiring ideas from two women who have been working for decades on behalf of women and whose collaboration is the essence of being “in this together.”

Pre-Order Dr. Nancy’s new book

Linda’s ideas also appear in Dr. Nancy’s new book, In This Together: How Successful Women Support Each Other In Work and Life, along with thoughts, advice, and stories from 40 successful women across a variety of careers—from authors to actresses, CEOs, and professors—encouraging women to support each other in the workplace and in life. Learn about action plans on how all women can work together to break free from the binds of gender inequality? Then remember to pre-order your copy – and gifts for your friends.

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