Podcasts

Helping People in the Spirit of Love and Family

Helping People, Male Ally for Women's Equality

David Robb

David Robb was raised to help people in the spirit of love and family. In this case, the family was people of the world who his grandparents met in their travels, and anyone his father met who needed help, even the drunk, violent ones. His father felt that we’re all God’s children and we owe it to one another to help those in need. Their words of encouragement, gracious demeanor, humility and kindness molded David, now a successful investor for The Frontier Group (the investment arm of his family’s business), into sharing his gifts and connections with the world and embarking on projects to help our global family.

David started out interning on capital hill, then at the White House, but changed to a career in business and private equity to make a difference in the world. He said that he owes his path to having great mentors. First, his father, who congratulated him on even the smallest achievements, then Frank Carlucci, Chairman Emeritus of The Carlyle Group and the former US Secretary of Defense and Director of the CIA. David helped The Carlyle Group grow from $150 million to over $100 billion in equity under management. Now he’s turning those gifts to a larger purpose.

Utopia—On a Perpetual Mission to Help the Less Fortunate

In founding the Utopia residential ocean line company, David said that his idea was to create that bonding that happens with people on boats for a larger purpose. The ocean liner, which will house 190 private suites, plus a 5-star hotel and resort, will travel on a perpetual mission of helping the less fortunate, fostering peace initiatives and hosting gatherings of world leaders, first ladies and leaders in business, education and the arts. So far, the promotions have been totally word-of-mouth with people referring friends and family members. Organized much like a New York City Coop, interested people go through a financial fitness review and an interview to determine if their character fits the good-hearted, kind people they want to share the journey with. The group is international, and while there are a lot of Americans, the larger family is truly global with people from the Middle East, Europe and Asia. http://www.utopiaresidences.com/

Being a Mentor and Other Actions as a Male Ally

Of course, David has begun his male ally role as a lot of men do. He has a daughter and is conscious of how she views her place in the world. Because mentors were such a factor in his own life, he tries to be one in hers—taking her to the office so she can see women in a professional situation and sharing his work day with her, to demystify the role of the CEO and see it as something attainable if she should choose business for her future. He is also active in the Harvard Business School Women’s Student Association, and he networks there and recruits younger women from that group. As a graduate of Harvard Business School, he sees that as his tribe and is part of how he gives back and gets top talent in return. He mentions several other women he’s recruited for top positions and how he’s organizing a First Ladies gathering to create a United Nations of First Ladies on board the Utopia to launch a special philanthropic, politically-neutral program.

Listen for More Stories and More Ideas for Helping Others

David told about more ventures where he is helping others and serving as a male ally to women in business, including a new “top secret” technology platform to help women entrepreneurs create home-based businesses. The central idea is David’s belief that true empowerment for women is realized when they “achieve some incremental financial independence and stability.” He stresses that it’s not just self-confidence, it’s being able to support yourself and your family. There is much more. Listen to the interview and read more about Utopia, and more about the life journey of David Robb.

Order Dr. Nancy’s new book or pick it up at your book store

Learn more about getting male allies in Nancy’s new book, In This Together: How Successful Women Support Each Other In Work and Life. How when women win, men win as well—along with thoughts, inspiration, and stories from 40 successful women across a variety of careers—from authors to actresses, CEOs and professors—encouraging women to support each other in the workplace and in life. Learn about action plans on how all women can work together to break free from the binds of gender inequality. Then remember to get your copy – and gifts for your friends. We are truly one family, women and men supporting and working together.

OmniWin Focus Recognizes That We’re Much Better Together

Ed Martin

Ed Martin, OmniWin Officer for 5th Element Group, says that “a focus on omni-win recognizes that we’re so much better together,” and his great joy has been to bring other men, who have been socialized to believe in the “I win – you lose” dynamic, into that inclusive everybody-wins community. He has found that most men “get it, either inherently or when they are brought into the mix, they feel it.” Ed says that he is purpose-driven and believes when you focus on the relationships, much better results naturally follow–that’s the real omni-win. In fact, he says, “There is no person that is a means to an end with me. It’s about the person.” He admits that getting a Key Performance Indicator (KPI) is wonderful, but “it can’t be more important than the relationships along the way—that’s the whole point of life.”

As a marketer for fortune 500 companies, Ed was anything but purpose-driven in his career. His background urge to join the Peace Corps was derailed by an MBA and a career working for large companies like Coca Cola and Kellogg.  In the early 90’s he stumbled on a formula where he could satisfy part of his urge to do good while acquiring the market research the big corporations needed. It was simple: get the charitable organizations to provide the population to test product marketing. The big marketing budgets could serve both the company and community needs—an omni-win solution. He continued to create these omni-wins as he moved from The Kellogg Company to Coca-Cola to Citigroup to Ford Motor Company and finally the Hershey Company.

Sticking to these ideals has led him down a path where the final result is that everybody does win—big corporations as well as causes like poverty, education and clean water. Today, through his work at 5th Element Group, he links those who need funding and solutions to those who can help provide both.

The Magic of #5, as in 5th Element and SDG5 (Achieve Women’s Equality)

Now working strictly in the “social” profit sector, serving on many boards, including being an advisor the UN’s Millennium Project, Ed continues to engage omni-win techniques to solve the problems of the world. The 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), established in 2016,  built on that project and assigned a number  to the SDGs. SDG5 is Achieve Women’s Equality Empower Women and Girls. Women’s rights are really human rights, as the famous saying goes, and more importantly, Ed notes that when SDG5 is advanced, all of the other SDGs advance too. Therefore, the founders of 5th Element Group, assigned the 5th element as the “human element” playing off of the designation in SDG5.

The human element brings people together. Ed says that when different genders, races or age groups work together on something that matters in a major way, you get to know them deeply. The same is holding true for companies. When diverse groups come together, they create “warm brands” that include everyone and erase the 2-dimentional perspective that blocks us from really seeing one another. The final link in the 5th Element Group is the declaration of the 5th Industrial Revolution. Ed describes this as the revolution where technology will finally serve people rather than control them. <link>

What Men and Women Can Do to Get More Male Allies

When Dr. Nancy asked Ed this question, he said, “You did it. You invited me.” Ed felt honored and pleased to be invited to be the first man to be invited to Smart, Amazing Conversations with Dr. Nancy. He also suggested that if a man is doing something good for women, tell him. Men need to know that their efforts are appreciated and welcomed. Ed also advised that men invite other men to participate. He shared how he had invited one of his male colleagues to join the board of Athena International (international business women group) where he serves.  He said that once a man is invited, he will invite other men, and each will recruit another to become a male ally and create more omni-wins.

More Stories and Omni-Wins

Listen to this interview to hear more of Ed’s story, about the women in his life and how he is using his omni-win skills to accelerate change and make an impact in the world. Check out this example of how #SeeHer created an omni-win for big brands by creating a more accurate depiction of women in their product marketing.

Order Dr. Nancy’s new book or pick it up at your book store

Learn more about getting male allies in Nancy’s new book, In This Together: How Successful Women Support Each Other In Work and Life. It’s full of omni-wins—how when women win, men win as well—along with thoughts, inspiration, and stories from 40 successful women across a variety of careers—from authors to actresses, CEOs and professors—encouraging women to support each other in the workplace and in life. Learn about action plans on how all women can work together to break free from the binds of gender inequality. Then remember to get your copy – and gifts for your friends.

 

Gender Partnership Lifts Women Up

Gender Partnership Lifts Women UP

Rayona Sharpnack

Rayona Sharpnack calls gender partnership her life’s work and sees it as a means to lift women up and help them claim their power. Growing up in rural California with only three brothers to play with, Rayona learned to excel at sports so she could play with the boys. However, when she tried to get a scholarship for her athletic achievements, there was nothing available for girls. She worked to get Title IX passed throughout her college career, which it did in her senior year. But she didn’t stop there. She went on to fight for gender equality throughout her many devoted decades of commitment to creating breakthrough results, founding both the Institute for Women’s Leadership and the Institute for Gender Partnership. Rayona said that when she started the institute 20 years ago, she put a stake in the ground and said, “The future of civilization is completely dependent upon the full partnership of men and women.”

Cracking the Code on Gender Equality

30 years ago, Rayona’s vision was that we had to work on three fronts all at the same time to crack the code on gender equality.

  1. Empowering women with and for each other—working together to lift each other up.
  2. Engaging men as allies and advocates.
  3. Removing institutional barriers and blind spots.

Rayona says if you don’t do all three simultaneously, you won’t get enough traction to change the ecosystem. Today, with all the problems that threaten our way of life, we need gender balanced teams in government, commerce and education to solve them.

The Guys Who Get It Awards

Rayona founded The Guys Who Get It Awards to “amplify positive deviation.” The phrase was coined by a Jerry and Monique Sternin who worked to solve a hunger crisis for Save the Children. After watching the villages in Vietnam for some time, they realized that the villages that did not have starving children were fed bits of river crabs or snakes along with their river weed soup. The bit of protein helped these children thrive. Their solution was to have the mothers who were doing this train those who were not. In this way they redirected their ecosystem in a positive way.

Through The Guys Who Get It Awards, Rayona amplified and disseminated the best practices of men who were practicing gender partnership. Her goal was to keep other guys from going to sleep thinking, “I don’t know what to do.” The buzz created by the awards made the guys who received it proud. They wanted it on their wall and they amplified the effect by sharing their awards and reasons for getting it with others.

Every Guy Can Be A Male Ally

There is something everyone can do. For guys, Rayona says they need to understand the difference between mentorship and sponsorship. Both are important, but sponsorship requires stepping out there and taking a stand. She also advises that guys can just pay attention. If they see a woman not taking a seat at the table, or one of her ideas being adopted by a man as his own, they can speak up and support her, or redirect and take it back to the point of origination. Finally, Rayona said that often guys think they’re helping, when they are actually practicing benevolent sexism. For example, when they don’t allow a woman to take that new job because she has young children at home, they hold her back. It’s important to let women choose if they can accept the promotion, rather than choosing for them.

There is much more wonderful advice in this conversation. Listen to Rayona’s insights and check out The Institute for Women’s Leadership, The Institute for Gender Partnership and The Guys Who Get It Awards for more information. Also, check out Rayona’s leadership book, Trade Up: 5 Steps for Redesigning Your Leadership & Life from the Inside Out.

Order Dr. Nancy’s new book or pick it up at your book store

Read more about Rayona’s Guys Who Get It Awards and how to engage male allies in Dr. Nancy’s new book, In This Together: How Successful Women Support Each Other In Work and Life, along with thoughts, inspiration, and stories from 40 successful women across a variety of careers—from authors to actresses, CEOs and professors—encouraging women to support each other in the workplace and in life. Learn about action plans on how all women can work together to break free from the binds of gender inequality. Then remember to get your copy – and gifts for your friends. After you’ve read it, please, leave us a 5-star review on Amazon. Your review will help us reach more women with proven techniques for achieving gender equality by working with other women and our male allies.

Jamia Wilson Says Yes to Get Her Voice Heard

Says Yes To Get Her Voice Heard

Jamia Wilson

Jamia Wilson admits to being a yes-person. By saying yes to every opportunity to get her voice heard on behalf of women, she has become a vocal social advocate, writer and outspoken feminist, who has been called “the next generation thought leader.” But really her time is now—right now. Linking generations of feminists, Jamia is the youngest and first woman of color to lead the nearly 50-year-old Feminist Press as executive director, and a children’s story author, molding the next generation of women. She credits the focus her parents put on education, and the guidance from her mother and grandmother, who she calls “powerhouses and trailblazers in their field.” She says that she is grateful for the healthy collaborative relationships she had with them and other women who put her work at the intersection of feminism, human rights, activism and story-telling.

When so much is dividing us these days, Jamia seeks to bring us all together by saying yes to every opportunity to empower the next generation, remind us of our humanity, and credit those generations of women who paved the way for her to pave the way for others.

Mentors Help You Claim Your Power

Jamia has been fortunate to have some amazing mentors. She went to work for Planned Parenthood straight out of college and her boss was Gloria Feldt, who was Executive Director at the time. Today Gloria is author of the best-seller, No Excuses: Nine Ways Women Can Change the Way We Think about Power, and co-founder of Take the Lead, which seeks to gain parity for women by 2025. Gloria remained Jamia’s mentor after she came to New York, and Jamia says, “She [Gloria] has always had a vision for me that is bigger than myself.” This kind of mentoring makes a person reach and strive to meet the expectations of their mentor. Beyond that, her mother and grandmother taught her to look to older women for advice about how to tap into her own strength. That is where Jamia says women’s real power lies—enduring with resilience and persistence again and again no matter what comes your way.

Feminist Press Helps Women’s Voices Be Heard

Founded in 1970, the Feminist Press at the City University of New York, is about to celebrate its 50th anniversary. The Press exists to amplify feminist voices around the world and was founded in the second wave of feminism. Jamia spoke of a recent meeting they had with the founder, Florence Howell, who just turned 90 in March. Florence admitted that when she started it, she just saw it as an idea, but checks arrived from women wanting to support it. Even then, she thought it would only last about 10 years—that the issues would surely be solved by then—that the publishers would understand what an important part of the market women are.

Jamia says that she thinks the reason why The Press is still here is the root causes of the issues (the dehumanization of people, of human suffering, of all the isms) have not been addressed. As long as there is the power of domination, people will be marginalized and voices will need a platform to speak out and help them be heard.

Listen to this interview for more stories about Jamia’s experiences growing up in Saudi Arabia, at events with Gloria Steinem and more about her perspective on today’s feminists. Check out her website, for a complete list of her books, her blog and her speaking schedule. And please visit and buy books from The Feminist Press. Your support helps The Press keep operating. It’s the most basic form of women supporting other women.

Order Dr. Nancy’s new book or pick it up at your book store

Read more about Jamia in Dr. Nancy’s new book, In This Together: How Successful Women Support Each Other In Work and Life, along with thoughts, inspiration, and stories from 40 successful women across a variety of careers—from authors to actresses, CEOs and professors—encouraging women to support each other in the workplace and in life. Learn about action plans on how all women can work together to break free from the binds of gender inequality. Then remember to get your copy – and gifts for your friends. After you’ve read it, please, leave us a 5-star review on Amazon. Your review will help us reach more women with proven techniques for achieving gender equality by working with other women and our male allies.

Helping Women Make Their Voices Heard

Tabby Biddle

Once Tabby Biddle found her inner power and spoke out about human rights abuses on behalf of women and girls, her next step was obvious, help other women speak out to make their voices heard. That’s how she became a coach in support of women with a message for the TEDx stage. Four years ago, when Tabby shared her life story in her own TEDx presentation, she learned that only 17% of TED speakers were women. She was given three main reasons for the discrepancy: they had trouble finding women speakers; women were more likely to say no, and women were more likely to back out. Tabby had trouble believing these were the real reasons, so she began her own research from the trenches, working with women to prepare them, not just for the TEDx stage, but to communicate their legacy and speak out to change the world in ways that will support those who come after them.

Why Women Play Small—Overcoming Their Own Gender Bias

Tabby said that women put up hundreds of barriers to taking a stand on the TEDx stage. She’s heard excuses like,

  • Am I qualified enough?
  • Will anyone care what I have to say?
  • Hasn’t this all been said before?

Then there’s the usual:

  • I’m too busy now.
  • I’m totally overwhelmed with work and family.

Tabby explains that all of these reasons are a front for a woman’s lack of self-confidence and desire to continue to play small. When women put themselves out there on the TEDx stage, they show their vulnerabilities, which many have hidden to play in the man’s world of strength and power, while hiding their own inner-power and feminine leadership skills. They have allowed their vulnerabilities to keep them in their place, playing the “good girl,” who is liked by everyone and feels comfortable staying where cultural bias keeps her. It’s less risky, and fits what other people have told them to think about themselves and where they belong in the world.

100 Women in Hollywood Claim Their Power

Last year, Tabby teamed up with Elisa Parker, founder of See Jane Do, to direct Take the Lead’s signature program, 50 Women Can Change the World in Media and Entertainment.  A cross section of 50 women from the creative side of media and from the executive and agency sides were nominated to participate, learn and adapt Gloria Feldt’s Nine Power Tools for their industry. The cohort completely changed many of their lives. Tabby said their network switched from being 98% men who they asked for work to 80% women who referred them or who they referred for work. The rewards were they finally claimed their power from within and built a community where they could honestly speak their mind and heart. Tabby said the program catapulted many of their careers—they are hiring each other, and winning awards they never even got nominated for prior to 50 Women.

The evolution of 50 Women Can for Tabby and Elisa was a day-long retreat for women leaders working at the forefront of gender equity, inclusion and diversity in Hollywood. Many groups and organizations were working for the same thing but doing it in isolation from one another and carrying it out in different ways. The day-long retreat, known as 100 Women Can Change Hollywood, helped them build their lines of trust and develop friendships and relationships that allowed them to find ways they could further align and collaborate. The women were very grateful to have this safe, all-women community where they could be creative about ways to help women in Hollywood claim their power and create equitable opportunities for women to tell their stories.

Next Step—Getting Men as Allies

Tabby said that as much as we’ve talked about needing an all female-centered group, we’re also at a point where we need to build partnerships with men from the female perspective. And, she added, there are a lot of men in the industry who want to work for gender equity, but are afraid of making a mistake or saying the wrong thing. Not only that, they want to be with other men working toward the same thing.

The next step is a program for 100 People—Women and Men—designed in a way that allows each group to meet separately for three months, and then come together for a final three months. Both male and female speakers will address the groups, and a university has been approached for hosting and documenting the progress. Tabby and Dr. Nancy both think it will be a landmark event. It will be the first time a group of this nature has used the balance of the masculine and the feminine to work toward such an important goal that affects us all. Tabby predicts that having seen the communities formed by both 50 Women and 100 Women, this new community of male allies directed from the feminine perspective will have powerful results.

Listen to this conversation to learn more about Tabby’s plans to advance women and how she can help you make your voice heard. Tabby says that every story is told from different life experiences, so each is unique and powerful and needs to be heard by someone new. Check out her website, buy her book, Find Your Voice: A Women’s Call to Action, and watch for new TED online classes or contact Tabby for personal coaching.

Order Dr. Nancy’s new book or pick it up at your book store

Tabby’s work to help women speak out on the TED stage is discussed in Nancy’s new book, In This Together: How Successful Women Support Each Other In Work and Life. Her ideas are expressed, along with thoughts, inspiration, and stories from 40 successful women across a variety of careers—from authors to actresses, CEOs and professors—encouraging women to support each other in the workplace and in life. Learn about action plans on how all women can work together to break free from the binds of gender inequality. Then remember to get your copy – and gifts for your friends.

Discovering How Women Can Support Women

Women Support Women

Paige Oxendine

Paige Oxendine is a walking, talking example of what happens when you live each day to do your best. She credits her parents with instilling in her great values such as contributing to and being part of the community, doing your best, and working hard. Paige took these lessons to heart in her school and professional life to help entrepreneurs with additional support for women.

This articulate young millennial began her journey to leadership during four years of competitive high school debate, where she learned how to develop various communication styles. These enabled her “to communicate with people who may hold different viewpoints from your own and still have a rational and reasonable conversation.” Paige moved on to college, participated in student government, and was elected Student Body President at Missouri State University while achieving her degree in public relations and socio-political communication. But she specifically credits participation in the Sue Shear Institute for Women in Public Life among the formative events and people that gave her the background and inspiration to pursue community service.

In the 10 years since graduation, Paige’s community work has included Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce managing a team of young professionals under 40. She is currently employed as Program Coordinator for Missouri State’s e-Factory, a business incubator, workspace, network environment, training center and more.

Helping Women Helps Everyone

Like many of her generation, Paige believes in doing well while doing good. The idea that “a rising tide floats all boats” is at the heart of her approach to economic development, and she knows that helping women helps everyone.  She works to create programs and an environment that will inspire entrepreneurs to create “the next big thing” that will help everyone in the community.

Transforming the biases we have about what leadership looks like is a really big thing. While participating in the Shear Institute she met women who make policy in the state of Missouri, and debated the issues they face as members of government. Paige told Dr. Nancy that people still envision the U.S. President as a man, a perspective we need to change in ourselves and in the next generation before a woman has a hope of occupying the Oval Office.

Rosie Helps Women Claim Their Power

As told in the final chapter of Dr. Nancy’s latest book  In This Together, Paige collaborated with Rachel Anderson to create Rosie, a women’s networking group in Springfield, Missouri. Paige said they were inspired to do this when they noticed that leadership in the region was overwhelmingly “pale and male.” The same six women served on all the boards that had women, and they were overworked because they were afraid if they said no, there would be no women at all. With the help of The Women’s Foundation based in Kansas City, they got a grant for initial funding, and used their community contacts and relationships to start a network that is now 1,000 strong.

Getting Men As Allies and Advocates

Their goal for Rosie was to create a free database of information from local women about their experiences, their interests and their skill sets, so they could link women with speaking opportunities, board openings and jobs outside of their workplace or industry. They expected 60 people at the Rosie launch party but more than 200 showed up. Men wanted to participate too, so they launched Brosie  for awesome men who wanted to become allies and advocates.  Two-and-a-half years later, the momentum continues and Rosie has an exciting future serving women in the community.

Listen to this conversation between Dr. Nancy and Paige for more personal stories and advice on working together to create opportunities for ourselves and others. Hear more about how these two amazing young women started Rosie and check out the website for more wisdom on helping women by helping our communities.

Order Dr. Nancy’s new book or pick it up at your book store

The story of Rosie appears in Nancy’s new book, In This Together: How Successful Women Support Each Other In Work and Life, as an inspiring example of how you can develop your own community network. Read the thoughts, inspiration, and stories from 40 successful women across a variety of careers—from authors to actresses, CEOs and professors—encouraging women to support each other in the workplace and in life. Learn about action plans for working together to break free from the binds of gender inequality. Buy a copy for yourself and gifts for your friends.

Creating Social Change With and For Women

Sarah Acer founded Align Communication & Creative as an experiment to see if she could work on projects that created social change with women who shared her values to do the same. Ten working moms, many of them young mothers, left their big brand careers to work on projects that aligned with their personal values while also allowing them to control their time, and balance their life and careers. Four years later, the women-owned collective has built a new kind of agency — one that includes the perks, projects and people they always daydreamed about—and where they can challenge the status quo, solve complex problems and drive social change.

At 14, Sarah began her first initiative to create social change when she joined the Truth Campaign, the nationwide tobacco education and cessation program to stop the epidemic of teenage smoking. Watching her grandmother progress from macular degeneration, breast cancer to lung cancer and still be unable to stop smoking enlightened her to the power of a harmful habit. 20 years later, Sarah is still involved with the campaign, but has broadened her scope to include big business that is also good business with an emphasis on those serving under-served communities.

Solve for XX

In 2018 Sarah co-founded Solve for XX , an organization set up to solve issues that impact people with XX chromosomes (women). With a grant from The State Department, through the Nelson Mandela Exchange Program, a young African leader is matched with American entrepreneurs. Sarah and her partner, Kristen Romaine were matched with – an equally amazing woman from Uganda who runs Women in Tech Uganda. They collaborated originally to help Women in Tech run more efficiently.  But the pilot program they developed went much further..

Solve for XX became a 24-hour hackathon, during which participants were trained in business skills, like writing resumes, applying for jobs, and creating a business plan, and then matched with mentors to guide them. During the final 12 hours, participants were divided into teams to identify and develop solutions for the problems women face in their communities. In Kampala, Uganda, where this hackathon took place, early marriage and pregnancy tie women to a way of life that keeps them stuck in poverty. Business plans emerged from the participants, which were rewarded with microfinancing for businesses that can transform lives. Sarah said the microfinance part of the program was unintentional, but when they were presented with pitches that only required $100 to run a business for six months, they provided the funding to proceed. This leg up helps women help their families and ultimately their entire community, country, and even the world. More Solve for XX hackathons are planned for Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, Detroit, Michigan and Catania, Italy. If you’d like to volunteer, mentors are needed via Skype.

Millennials Moving into Leadership in 2020

The future is here, and the first group to outnumber baby boomers is becoming half of the workforce. As one of them, Sarah’s own passion for pursuing a life of service places her in the majority. Sarah said that most millennials care less about the monetary rewards of salaries and more about workplace culture, family leave and other benefits that support healthy and happy lifestyles. Because they have entered the workforce in such numbers they are also moving into leadership. That means they will command large budgets and make decisions to support their values as they become middle and upper level managers.

Healthier cultures in the workplace is one part of Sarah’s thesis for her doctoral dissertation. She is also exploring how implicit bias holds women back from achieving full parity. We all have biases and she said the first step is to recognize them so we can work on correcting the way we perceive ourselves and others. The key to getting women in top management is getting a woman in top management. She likens it to the chicken and egg syndrome. Bias, from both men and women, keeps them from getting in the door. Nancy added one of her favorite sayings, “When you get through the door, take three women with you.”

Listen to this conversation for more of Sarah’s personal story and her ideas on how we can help women achieve parity and full equality. Check out her website to learn more about Align Communication and Creative. And be sure to check out Solve for XX to see how you can help women help themselves and their families transform their lives.

Order Dr. Nancy’s new book or pick it up at your book store

Sarah’s viewpoint about millennials in the workplace and research about eliminating bias also appear in Dr. Nancy’s new book, In This Together: How Successful Women Support Each Other In Work and Life, along with thoughts, inspiration, and stories from 40 successful women across a variety of careers—from authors to actresses, CEOs and professors—encouraging women to support each other in the workplace and in life. Learn about action plans on how all women can work together to break free from the binds of gender inequality. Then remember to get your copy – and gifts for your friends.

 

 

 

 

Use Your Special Talents and Speak Up

Teaching women to use special talents and speak up

Kathy Caprino

Kathy Caprino helps women discover their special talents and learn how they can use them to light up the world with the career of their dreams. Once a successful, but unhappy corporate vice president, Kathy had to have her own crisis and breakthrough to found Ellia Comunications, Inc., and become the international career coach, author and speaker she is today. Now living her own dream, Kathy is helping others break through their power gaps, find their bravery and seize opportunities for successful, purposeful lives.

Who Are You?

Before a coaching session, Kathy said that she gives women and men 11 pages of questions to answer on her career path assessment. The first question asks who you are and what makes you special, and Kathy is astounded that women cannot answer that question. She remarks that she couldn’t do it either 30 years ago when she had her own career and life crisis. But she stresses that you must be able to answer that question before you can begin to do what you truly want and live the satisfying fulfilling life on the inside as well as outside. She calls this process “Finding Brave.” She has named her podcast after the process and interviews guests who have found their own bravery to help them work through their own special talents.

Power Gaps

Power gaps are those aspects of you that allow you to stay stuck doing things with people that make you unhappy. These gaps cause you to put up with toxic work environments, less pay than you deserve, sexual harassment, and all sorts of negativity that stops you from making the contributions that will fulfill your life’s purpose. Kathy wrote an article identifying and explaining all seven power gaps for Forbes , the first of which is “Not Recognizing Your Special Talents, Abilities and Accomplishments.”

Kathy said that when you close your power gaps, problems seem to dissolve of their own accord. You find that you will no longer allow that overbearing boss to scare you into obedience or hide your true opinions to keep the peace in difficult situations. You take the credit you deserve, gather support from influential associates and define yourself from a brave present-tense perspective.

Insights from Therapist Training

Dr. Nancy and Kathy share more insights from their mutual training in psychotherapy. Kathy said many of us still carry childhood trauma around with us and allow it to hold us back. Even seemingly supportive parental behavior can steer us in a different path from where we need to go. Listen to more of her personal story, how she discovered her own special talent, and learn more about her book, which is due out in 2020. Check out her website for more about her programs, her blog, speaking, events and personal growth resources, and to access her career path assessment to discover your own talents.

Order Dr. Nancy’s new book or pick it up at your book store

Kathy’s insights also appear in Dr. Nancy’s new book, In This Together: How Successful Women Support Each Other In Work and Life, along with thoughts, inspiration, and stories from 40 successful women across a variety of careers—from authors to actresses, CEOs and professors—encouraging women to support each other in the workplace and in life. Learn about action plans on how all women can work together to break free from the binds of gender inequality. Then remember to get your copy – and gifts for your friends.

 

 

 

 

 

From My Heart to Yours

Dr. Nancy’s daughter, Ragan Thomson is a healer, spiritual coach, and divine facilitator. Her life and work intentions are to raise consciousness, bring forth light to humanity, and heal one soul at a time.

Ragan hosts live events at the stunning Thomson Sanctuary in Montecito, California. During these events, her guests participate in meditation, sacred connection, circle sharing, and coaching. She also releases free weekly audio messages, where she guides her audience through a transformational journey to authenticity, truth, and awakening of the divine.

In this episode of Ragan’s podcast series “From My Heart To Yours”, she invites Dr. Nancy to take part in a meaningful conversation about the harmonization of the masculine and the feminine. The episode goes in-depth into aligning with your true self and expressing your own masculine and/or feminine essence.

Click here to listen to Ragan’s  interview with her mom, Dr. Nancy O’Reilly.

If you enjoyed this episode of  “From My Heart To Yours podcast, you can stay up to date with Ragan’s social media pages @Ragan_Thomson.

What Adolescents Think About Gender Inequality

Gender Equality

Cheryl Benton

As a successful NYC advertising professional, Cheryl Benton knows a thing or two about creating media images that create public perception, which is why she was disturbed when she saw a survey that reported US adolescent girls still perceived the #1 value for girls and women is their appearance. No matter how hard we’ve tried to change that viewpoint, girls are pressured about their looks more than ever before with the prevalence of social media and a culture that is stuck in the midst of gender inequality.

To get that needle to move, Cheryl says that we need to educate everyone. And that begins with everyone reading Dr. Nancy’s new book, In This Together. Cheryl says that every college campus should have it and every corporation should make it required reading. Changing people’s perception and giving a voice to women is Cheryl’s passion. She began her successful international media platform, The Three Tomatoes.com, when she began to feel invisible in her 50’s. She saw that advertisers were not speaking to her or her friends, and she decided that they could just talk to one another. Her little group of 60 people grew among women from coast to coast and around the world found messages that resonated with them also. As Head Tomato, Cheryl continues to look for ways to empower women and girls and her newest volunteer effort was to found the NYC Leadership Council for Plan International USA.

Plan International Lifting Girls Out of Poverty

Cheryl explains that Plan International has been fighting for children’s rights (mostly in developing countries) since 1937. More recently, they have realized the importance of lifting girls out of poverty. Her role with the NYC Leadership Council is to help raise awareness and funding for the “Because I’m a Girl” program. In the spring of 2018, Plan International sponsored a survey of 1,006 adolescent girls and boys about gender equality, which resulted in the report, “The State of Gender Equality for US Adolescents.”

Although 95% of teens between 10 and 19 years old believed in gender equality, there was more confusion about what that meant. Most (54%) were more comfortable with women continuing traditional roles. But there was quite a difference between boys’ and girls’ perspectives on the current status of inequality. Cheryl summarized the difference in perspectives: 21% of girls thought there is currently gender equality, while 41% of boys think there is. And over 51% of girls think it’s a problem, contrasted with only 19% of boys who think it’s an issue. Similar findings among women and men bear out that this doesn’t change much with age. However, Cheryl believes the onus is on the school systems who have no curriculum to educate children and teens about genders and sex education, and the media of course, which plays a huge role perpetuating cultural norms. And Dr. Nancy added that parents also have a responsibility to guide their children, help them see through the corrected gender lens at home, provide role models and mentor them toward achieving their goals.

Great Messages from In This Together

When Dr. Nancy asked Cheryl to share her pearls of wisdom, Cheryl started quoting things she had underlined in Dr. Nancy’s new book. One powerful line Cheryl said she noted was how are feminine traits are actually our power tools. If we perceive them that way, companies will also begin to see them as powerful assets to the business. Another piece of advice she thought was important is, “Ask for what you want.” She noted that men are so much better at negotiating than women. She urges her daughter to go in and ask for that raise, telling her how to point out what she has done for the company and why she deserves it.

Ultimately Cheryl says, the most important thing is to believe in yourself. That core belief will help us stand up to those who would tear us down. For today’s women, she sees social media as especially challenging for younger women. You have to be really strong to stand up to the naysayers and those who thrive on tearing others down.  That’s why she says the power of girl friends is so important. She hearkens back to In This Together in its advice to build your council or team of supporters to amplify your voice.

Lift As You Go

Listen to this great conversation for more information and great advice from these two Leading Women co-authors. And check out The Three Tomatoes.com website for what to do in NYC, LA and San Francisco, plus great make-over and fashion advice ,and how to buy Cheryl’s books, Can You See Us Now: A Novel for Grownups and Martini Wisdom: and Other Midlife Musings from The Three Tomatoes, must-reads for tomatoes everywhere.

Order Dr. Nancy’s new book or pick it up at your book store

Read the great advice that Cheryl mentioned and others in Dr. Nancy’s new book, In This Together: How Successful Women Support Each Other In Work and Life, along with thoughts, inspiration, and stories from 40 successful women across a variety of careers—from authors to actresses, CEOs and professors—encouraging women to support each other in the workplace and in life. Learn about action plans on how all women can work together to break free from the binds of gender inequality. Then remember to get your copy – and gifts for your friends.

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