Time’s Up

How to Help Women To Be More Powerful

Linda Rendleman

Linda Rendleman is the ultimate supporter of women’s work and lives and breathes her daily mantra, “Be the miracle in your own life.” She has won numerous awards for her writing and speaking, including, “The Torchbearer Award,” the highest award is given to a woman by her home state of Indiana for making a significant difference in the lives of women everywhere. Her reach stretches to Kenya, where her Women Like Us Foundation launched The Women’s Micro-Enterprise Program, which helps women survivors of sex trafficking or domestic abuse gain a sense of community through which they can help each other acquire new skills and tools to earn their livings. In Los Angeles, Rendleman’s foundation has established a similar mentoring program for women survivors of sex trafficking, homelessness or domestic violence, called Women Like Us Achieve, which she hopes to expand throughout the U.S.

Tend and Befriend Is Linda’s In This Together FAV

Linda stressed how excited she is about the ideas she read in Dr. Nancy’s new book In This Together. She and Dr. Nancy have walked similar paths in their advocacy for women (since the days when women couldn’t get credit cards in their own name or birth control if they weren’t married) and she feels a tremendous reward at the momentum that is building for women. In reading about how women’s natural inclination in times of crisis is to “tend and befriend” instead of fight or flight, Linda said it expresses perfectly how she feels about women supporting other women. The mission of her Women Like Us Foundation is to support other women’s leadership, which forms the core of all her efforts and is the reason she co-produced the powerful documentary “Women Like Us. Three Journeys. One Mission. To Change the World.”  The film chronicles three women’s journeys facing adversity, growth, and evolution, and offers inspiration from powerful role models around the world.

Mothers and Daughters Support Women’s Empowerment Together

Linda’s daughter Catt Sadler recently quit her high-profile celebrity job at E-Entertainment when they refused to pay her a salary equivalent to that of her male co-host who was doing half the work at twice the pay. Besides writing a book about her own journey, Catt has joined Linda to speak to groups within the Time’s Up movement in support of women’s equality. Linda talked about how thrilling it is to work together with her daughter on the same initiative. Dr. Nancy told of her own pleasure speaking with her daughter Ragan in programs for women. It takes “in this together” to a new level when women from different generations share their own perspectives and work to increase women’s leadership.

Creating Solutions Through Women Like Us

Linda’s three books in the Women Like Us series tell stories and provide advice to help women recognize their leadership potential, learn why it is important for them to lead, and to become more powerful.

In her upcoming salon in Los Angeles early in 2019, a panel will discuss sex trafficking. Linda said her ambassadors have dubbed it a “hackathon,” which means the roundtable discussion will focus on finding solutions that communities can realistically enact to solve their sex trafficking problem. Linda has found that there is no community that is immune to the problem. It literally is everywhere.  Initiatives work to fix both sides of the problem: the high demand from sex customers and those who profit by enslaving others.

Find out more about how WomenLikeUs.org is raising funds for women’s gender equality and social justice initiatives, including opportunities to help in your own community. Listen to this podcast for more inspiring ideas from two women who have been working for decades on behalf of women and whose collaboration is the essence of being “in this together.”

Pre-Order Dr. Nancy’s new book

Linda’s ideas also appear in Dr. Nancy’s new book, In This Together: How Successful Women Support Each Other In Work and Life, along with thoughts, advice, and stories from 40 successful women across a variety of careers—from authors to actresses, CEOs, and professors—encouraging women to support each other in the workplace and in life. Learn about action plans on how all women can work together to break free from the binds of gender inequality? Then remember to pre-order your copy – and gifts for your friends.

The #MeToo Moment at the Grammys

The 2018 Grammys did, in fact, have its #MeToo moment. In the wake of the “Time’s Up” movement’s inception at this year’s Golden Globes, there was a lot of speculation about how the music industry’s Recording Academy would choose to draw awareness to the issue of sexual assault and harassment, if at all, during the annual awards ceremony.
From the outset, it was inspiring to see a number of celebrities wearing a white rose. A group of female industry executives formed a group called “Voices of Entertainment” last week and sent an open letter to attendees encouraging them to wear a white rose in support of the #MeToo movement. “We choose the white rose because historically it stands for hope, peace, sympathy and resistance,” the letter read. And it wasn’t just women who decided to wear them. The preponderance of men wearing white roses to the ceremony exemplified the way men can support and sustain women. It’s especially helpful in environments where women are outnumbered, relatively powerless, and fear retribution for speaking up for themselves.
Was it a perfect night for women? No. Critics were quick to point out that of the 84 total awards presented, only 11 went to women. In a category that seemed primed to have a female winner with four of the five nominees being women, the award for Best Solo Pop Performance ultimately went to the lone male nominee (who didn’t even bother to show up for the ceremony). The Academy was also criticized for allowing all of the male nominees for Album of the Year to perform while Lorde, the one female nominee, was not given that same opportunity.
In spite of the evening’s shortcomings, several presenters and performers took the opportunity to bring the message of #MeToo to the Grammy stage. Lady Gaga began her performance of her hit “Million Reasons” by simply whispering, “Time’s up,” into her microphone. There was no second-guessing Pink’s message as she sang “There’s not enough rope to tie me down, there’s not enough tape to shut this mouth.”
Perhaps the most notable moment of the night took place when singer Janelle Monáe came to the stage to introduce a performance by Kesha. “Tonight, I am proud to stand in solidarity as not just an artist, but a young woman, with my fellow sisters in this room who make up the music industry — artists, writers, assistants, publicists, CEOs, producers, engineers, and women from all sectors of the business. We are also daughters, wives, mothers, sisters, and human beings. To those who would dare try and silence us, we offer you two words: Time’s Up. We say Time’s Up for pay inequality. Time’s Up for discrimination. Time’s Up for harassment of any kind. And Time’s Up for the abuse of power, because, you see, it’s not just going on in Hollywood. It’s not just going on in Washington. It’s right here in our industry as well. And just as we have the power to shape culture, we also have the power to undo the culture that does not serve us well. So, let’s work together, women and men, as a united music industry committed to creating more safe work environments, equal pay, and access for all women.”
As if Monáe’s speech wasn’t powerful enough, Kesha, who has been embroiled in a legal battle with a male producer over allegations of sexual abuse, performed her song “Praying,” which was written in response to her experiences of assault. It was an emotional performance that gave us a glimpse into her personal pain but also encapsulated a moment of “hope, peace, sympathy and resistance” as she sang surrounded by a chorus of women dressed in all-white as a symbol of solidarity.
What has been communicated through the songs and speeches of the Golden Globes and the Grammys is not a list of solutions but a chorus of reminders that there is work to be done in our society to address harassment and inequality on behalf of women everywhere. The ceremonies are over, but the work goes on.

A New Day for Women

by Dr. Nancy D. O’Reilly

With so many voices crying out to be noticed right now, it’s difficult to hear each individual message. Like everyone who watched the Golden Globe Awards, I cheered Oprah’s message about how Sidney Poitier’s winning the Oscar affected her as a young black girl watching from the cheap seats and how she is aware of the young black girls watching her today. For me, too, role modeling, mentoring and bringing up the next generation of women leaders is a strong motivator. But the most important part of her message for our times is her emphasis on using our stories to expose those who abuse their power over others. This power of our stories is what women are accessing today. If you listen carefully, you will hear one tale composed by many voices speaking all together, and as Oprah said in her speech, “women are the story.”
Now is the time for us to accelerate the momentum that began with the Women’s March a year ago by supporting #metoo and “Time’s Up.” We need to change the culture in permanent ways so these events and stories don’t fade into a forgotten history. This month Leadership Ambassadors Tabby Biddle and Elisa Parker are rolling out 50 Women Can Change the World in Media and Entertainment. This Take the Lead initiative both inspires women storytellers who work behind the cameras in Hollywood and gives them the tools to rise to roles where they can tell the stories women and girls need to hear.
Women are stepping forward to run for office in record numbers, with pro-choice Emily’s List reporting last November “nearly 21,000 women interested in running since last year’s election, up from a record 920 who expressed interest in the 2016 campaign.” We have a mid-term election cycle this year and with so many veteran senators retiring, there are opportunities for women candidates to replace elderly white men. In fact, black women’s solidarity in the South is credited for defeating Roy Moore in the Alabama special election and the call is out for more capable smart women leaders of all colors to step forward and serve their communities.
The Millennial women I speak with inspire me. Unlike my generation, they refuse to betray their gender to lead as men. They step forward as educated, talented young women who expect the companies that employ them to satisfy their needs for fulfillment at work, challenges and equal opportunities for advancement. But they also expect that workplace to be led by people who look like them, with women in direct proportion to men, especially on boards and in the C-suite, where women are notably missing. Their vision is of people of both genders working together as partners with respect for one another’s skills and accessing all that is available for a sustainable future for all of us.
As special correspondent for CBS Sunday Morning, Oprah interviewed a group of Hollywood activist women involved with Time’s Up, which they described as a campaign without a leader. Women can get it done without a specific leader. Their goal is to maintain momentum for women who cannot speak – because we have the spotlight. So far Time’s Up has raised $16 million legal defense fund to help plaintiffs get a lawyer. When Oprah asked if this movement was going to succeed in ending harassment and abuse, Lucas Film President Kathleen Kennedy said, “The time’s up for silence. We can start there.” Actress Tracee Ellis Ross said, “There’s a constructive fury for a resolute pursuit of equity.”
Yes, perpetrators need to gain an understanding of consent and respect and some men need extensive relearning. But the culture is still so toxic, there are many areas where even strong powerful women are still afraid to speak up. For now, let the focus remain on hearing and healing the women, rather than immediately shifting the spotlight to forgiveness and helping the perpetrators. Let the abusers feel uncomfortable for a while and listen to women. Reece Witherspoon paraphrased a quote by Elie Wiessel, “Silence helps the tormentors, not the tormented.”
I agree with Oprah and the other activist women that a new day is on the horizon. The time is NOW! I really believe we are ready to step forward and take charge of our future. Women and men are tired of feeling less and being used and ignored.  We want equality at last. In time, we can move forward to reconciliation and re-education. But right now, let’s reach out to support other women telling their stories, embrace this concept, open our hearts and souls to this new day, and heal together.

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