About Dr. Nancy

From My Heart to Yours

Dr. Nancy’s daughter, Ragan Thomson is a healer, spiritual coach, and divine facilitator. Her life and work intentions are to raise consciousness, bring forth light to humanity, and heal one soul at a time.

Ragan hosts live events at the stunning Thomson Sanctuary in Montecito, California. During these events, her guests participate in meditation, sacred connection, circle sharing, and coaching. She also releases free weekly audio messages, where she guides her audience through a transformational journey to authenticity, truth, and awakening of the divine.

In this episode of Ragan’s podcast series “From My Heart To Yours”, she invites Dr. Nancy to take part in a meaningful conversation about the harmonization of the masculine and the feminine. The episode goes in-depth into aligning with your true self and expressing your own masculine and/or feminine essence.

Click here to listen to Ragan’s  interview with her mom, Dr. Nancy O’Reilly.

If you enjoyed this episode of  “From My Heart To Yours podcast, you can stay up to date with Ragan’s social media pages @Ragan_Thomson.

Why Gaining Equality Inspires Women’s Hope

What a thrill to experience women’s quest for equality through the play, “Gloria: A Life” in New York City this past weekend! The theater-in-the-round evoked Gloria Steinem’s living room, with each seat backed by a colorful pillow, the stage filled with Persian rugs and ethnic prints, stacks of books, and electrified by a powerful ensemble cast of eight women actors. Multi-media projections brought history to life as Christine Lahti enacted Steinem’s career, starting as a “girl writer” in the news industry of the time, which was unashamedly dominated by white men, also portrayed to entertaining effect by women actors.

For two hours, we were THERE with the young Gloria as she struggled to escape the pink ghettos of fashion and beauty writing assignments, as she fought to gain recognition for her skills rather than her looks, and as she learned from experienced African-American organizers. Over the decades and in community with other women, she gained the courage to overcome her fear of public speaking and began her life’s work as an organizer.   We learned with her, as she spoke with other activists hundreds of times each year, learning and educating around a still-radical notion: women and men arefully equal and human.

My fifteen-year-old granddaughter sat riveted throughout the performance, and said she learned a lot that she had not known about the women’s fight for equality. I learned a lot too:

  • That the U.S. Constitution was modeled after the Iroquois Confederacy, that Benjamin Franklin invited two Iroquois men to attend the Constitutional Convention as consultants, and that their first question was, “Where are your women?”
  • That despite denigrating public pronouncements by national (male) TV commentators, the first issue of magazine, which Steinem co-founded and published free of fashion and beauty advertising in 1971, sold out in Los Angeles in just eight days.
  • That experienced women activists of color were allowed to speak to the media only about race while Steinem, a newbie, was elevated as the spokesperson for women’s issues (which might explain a lot about racial tensions surrounding the 2016 Women’s Marches.)
  • That the protesters who piled bras, girdles and other restrictive clothing into a barrel never set a match to it because they could not get a fire permit and were too obedient to break the law, even though the press forever after dubbed them “Bra Burners.”

And so much more. What a great teaching tool! I hope the play becomes popular in high school theater programs because young people need to understand what it took to gain the rights they enjoy today.

The play is adapted from Steinem’s fascinating 2015 memoir My Life on the Road, and if you can’t get to New York to see the play, you should read the book. At the performance I attended, which was a benefit for TakeTheLead, Steinem herself led the audience discussion that forms an integral part of every performance. Women and men, young and old, asked questions, shared personal stories, and expressed their appreciation for the doors Steinem and her peers opened for all women today. Rights young women take for granted today were absolutely outrageous ideas then.  Sexual harassment, previously accepted as “just life,” is now a thingthat women can fight. Today women have a legal basis for seeking equal pay, equal opportunity, and the right to control our own bodies, even though progress is uneven and continually threatened.

Steinem, now 84, noted in her closing comments one benefit of growing old: she can remember when things were so much worse than today. She stressed that women’s equality is not something to be won in a mass movement later, but by each woman every day doing a small thing to stand up for equal rights. We gain the courage for those actions by connecting and living in community with others, sharing our stories, laughing and crying, and making our plans together. She left us with a challenge and a question: “What outrageous action for equality will you take in the next 24 hours?”

Dr. Nancy D. O’Reilly To Receive Take The Lead’s First Leading Woman Award

Dr. Nancy D. O’Reilly will be recognized in New York City on Tuesday, November 14, at Take The Lead Day, an event sponsored by Take The Lead, and celebrated around the world in a series of skill-based workshops, interactive panels, livestream watch parties and webinars in an additional 89 cities and 10 countries. In an evening featuring music, poetry, theater and a speech by former US Treasurer Rosie Rios, Dr. Nancy will receive the first Leading Woman Award in recognition of her many contributions to the advancement and empowerment of women.
“Nancy’s generosity is exceeded only by her wisdom as a board member and her indomitable optimism about our ability to achieve our mission of gender parity in leadership,” said Take The Lead’s cofounder and president, and Leading Women co-author Gloria Feldt. “Creating an award that derives from the title of her book seems perfect as a way to honor her on the first Take The Lead Day and by extension each time we give the award in the future.”
“Take The Lead Day is the perfect way for women to come together to discover solutions and employ specific strategies to achieve gender equity in leadership by 2025,” Dr. Nancy added. “If you can’t be in New York, that’s okay.  Sign up for some of the free and virtual events and live streaming.”
Take The Lead prepares, develops, inspires and propels women to take their fair and equal share of leadership positions across all sectors by 2025. It’s today’s women’s movement — a unique catalyst for women to embrace power and reach leadership parity. To sign up for the live, virtual, and streaming events, go to TakeTheLeadDay.com.
Dr. Nancy and the Women Connect4Good foundation share Take The Lead’s mission of advancing women to leadership parity by 2025.

Women Connect4Good Working For Parity

On December 20, 262 women (and men) came together to effectively change the world. That was the day that Women Connect4Good Inc. partnered with Take The Lead Women in an exciting and monumental 24-hour crowdfunding campaign to support them in their effort to propel women to take their fair and equal share of leadership positions across all sectors by 2025. As a part of the effort, we had 24 hours to raise $300,000. Women Connect4Good Foundation pledged to match every dollar up to $300.000. Other sponsors also pledged to match additional funds to achieve $600,000 in 24 hours.
We not only met that goal, we surpassed it. Through crowdsourcing we were able to raise $312,160!!! Take The Lead will use these funds as well as the Women Connect4Good match to support program growth, provide more free community resources, and give more women the training, mentorship and coaching they need to take the lead in their own lives and careers.
Take the Lead founder and Leading Women co-author Gloria Feldt was thrilled with the response, and touched by the Women Connect4Good contribution. “I don’t think I personally can ever honor and thank her (Dr. Nancy) enough. The money is great and essential, but it’s what the money MEANS for the future of this leadership parity movement that is most significant.”
“We were just at the place where we couldn’t possibly deliver on our mission in a truly significant way without building an infrastructure to support it. I was trying to do everything and that was just not sustainable,” Gloria added.  “This campaign, which could only have happened because of Nancy’s vision and collaborative spirit, is enabling Take The Lead to kick start the future. People love matching gifts because they know their own contributions will be doubled in value, and in this case, they were quadrupled in value, then Nancy matched them all!!”
The parallel missions of Women Connect4 Good and Take The Lead intersect with women’s empowerment, gender parity by 2025 and the support of women to work together to create a better world. It has always been Women Connect4 Good’s mission to educate people to develop women-helping-women networks to raise the status of women and change the world. And that runs perfectly with Take The Lead’s work.
Gloria, and Take The Lead’s co-founder Amy Litzenberger, a former investment banker with extensive experience in strategic planning and funding of start-up and emerging growth companies, came together in 2013 to form the organization. Amy was questioning why women had stalled at 18-20% across all sectors. Gloria, who had spent over 30 years advancing women, including having served as President and CEO of Planned Parenthood Federation of America, had been so obsessed with the very question Amy asked that she had literally written the book on it, No Excuses, 9 Ways Women Can Change How We Think About Power.
We both wanted to build a better world for the women we loved and respected,” Gloria said. “We did it for our friends and colleagues, women we watched hit the glass ceiling again and again. We did it for our daughters, hopeful we could create the right tools to help them embrace their power and live their lives without limits. We did it because we wanted to see women reach leadership equality and pay equity in our lifetime.
As Gloria says, as a community, we are united by our shared commitment and vision for equality. And as individuals, we must each do our part to support this movement and to build a better world. At Women Connect4Good, we can think of no better way to start a new year than to join hands with other women and together, change the world.
Donations to Women Connect4Good and Take The Lead Women are both tax deductible if you want to join us and help push these issues forward.

Women Helping Women Through Philanthropy

city-people-woman-streetWomen philanthropists are driving the ever-growing number of advocacy and charitable organizations seeking to advance the well-being of women and girls. The Women’s Philanthropy Institute (WPI) at Indiana University-Purdue University has found consistently that women and men give differently. In almost every income bracket, women give more than men: baby-boomer and older women gave 89% more to charity than men their age, and women in the top 25% of permanent income gave 156% more than men in that same category.
In trying to explain the gender giving differences, WIP has found that women tend to be more altruistic and empathetic than men, partly because of the way men and women are socialized regarding caring, self-sacrifice and the well-being of others. Men tend to give when an appeal frames the donation as being in the man’s self interest or as a way of maintaining the status quo, while women tend to give to promote social change or help those less fortunate, research suggests.
Women often focus on helping other women. For example, the Maverick Collective, founded by Kate Roberts and Melinda Gates, recruits high-net-worth female philanthropists to invest more than just their money to support women and girls around the globe. In addition to cash donations (starting at $1 million), the participating women also share their bright ideas and remain heavily involved as key leaders over time, even traveling to help evaluate the progress of a project.

Women Have a Long History of Helping

Women helping women and men is nothing new. In fact, women in America have always been agents of change – even when they had few officially recognized rights. In Colonial times, women tackled issues like moral reform, care of widows, children and the mentally ill, conditions for women prisoners, aid for soldiers, temperance, abolition of slavery, suffrage, libraries, the environment, culture, health issues, and more.
Women’s sense of their “place” changed dramatically in the 1800s, and they started to transition to a group of skilled fundraisers, passionate advocates, powerful leaders, dedicated volunteers, irresistible forces for social change, and tireless workers. Women of every ethnicity joined voluntary associations to raise money and especially to care for women and girls.
Women have done amazing things in terms of giving, and started Mount Holyoke Seminary, Smith College, Women’s Christian Temperance Union, American Red Cross, and YWCA to name a few. Women also established three-quarters of the public libraries in the United States, many before Andrew Carnegie became involved and later to raise the 10 percent match he required. Women in the Rockefeller and Vanderbilt families started the Museum of Modern Art and Whitney Museum of Art. Despite a slump in women’s philanthropic activities from the 1920s to the 1960s, women took an active role in the Civil Rights effort, feminism, and infiltration of the workforce. The 1970s saw formation of the Ms. Foundation, the first women’s fund in the United States.

Supreme Court Helps Women’s Efforts Expand

The philanthropy arena expanded for women in the 1980s when the Supreme Court ruled groups like Jaycees, Rotary, Lions and Kiwanis could no longer exclude women. It wasn’t long before women were serving as the officers running these philanthropic clubs. More recently women have organized to support equal rights for women, drunk driving laws, breast cancer research, economic development and employment opportunities for women, and many more.

Help Where You Can

Today more than 100 women’s funds around the globe belong to the Women’s Funding Network (WFN), representing a collective $465 million in working assets and invest over $60 million per year. WFN is is the largest philanthropic network in the world devoted to improving the lives of women and girls. All across the US, 131 United Ways have developed women’s leadership councils. Every year, more than 56,000 women volunteers in women’s leadership councils raise more than $155 million just from other women.
Giving isn’t limited to wealthy women. Small donations can yield big results. Is there an organization in your community that resonates with you? A place where you can donate your time, treasure, or talent? You don’t have to donate a million dollars to make a difference. Instead, focus on what you can to do to improve the status of women and girls in today’s society.
Seeing women find a better way of living proves our efforts are all worthwhile. We are all sisters, and women need help all over the world. It’s our job to help them. When we do, we have an impact, not only on their lives, but on the lives of their children and future generations, entire countries, indeed the world.
I am so honored to be a part of the work done by the many organizations Women Connect4Good supports. I urge each of you to find a way to reach out and help a sister somewhere in the world today. When women help women, we all win.
 

Calling All Women Ambassadors and Expert Trainers

AmbassadorsPostcardEverywhere you look, women are changing the face of leadership. Why? Because they are tired of waiting. They want to see gender parity in leadership in their lifetimes. At the current pace, this will not happen until 2095. Some powerful leaders of today’s women’s movement are gathering in Santa Barbara April 19-21 to help bring about that change. It’s all about collaboration and women helping other women.
Like Elisa Parker, Grass Valley, CA, who started her SeeJaneDo radio program six years ago with a grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. “My girls were then four and seven,” Elisa recalls, “and they were questioning why their world seemed so broken. I felt I had to try to create a world that served them, to create a platform for women’s voices to bring about change.” Part of her strategy is to participate in the April Santa Barbara training to become a Leadership Ambassador.
Women made great progress in the Sixties, Seventies and Eighties, yet their share of leadership has remained stuck at less than 20 percent for decades. It’s even worse for women of color. Doors have been opened, yet most women still do not step through to join the ranks of leadership.
Activist leaders have noticed their reluctance and begun to organize in earnest. Contrary to the stereotype of bitchy women, these women love to collaborate and partner with others. Elisa’s effort is one of thousands, led by ordinary women and stars alike, all determined to change the power equation: Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In, Kimberly Bryant’s Black Girls Code organization, Rinku Sen’s Race Forward organization, Jennifer Seibel Newsom’s #AskHerMore campaign, Geena Davis’s Institute on Gender in Media, just to name a few. This movement is characterized by mutual support, encouragement and collaboration.
Longtime women’s rights advocate Gloria Feldt, a former national president of Planned Parenthood and co-founder of Take The Lead, says these powerful leaders are ready to take it to the next level. She says women can achieve parity in leadership across all sectors by 2025, that she can teach them how, and that it’s time to share her knowledge so others can do it, too. Exemplifying the collaborative trend, Take The Lead currently partners with more than 40 universities, leadership organizations and businesses.
Dr. Nancy agrees. That’s why Women Connect4Good, Inc., is underwriting Gloria’s next Train-the-Trainer in Santa Barbara, April 20-21. An application form to participate is available online. After interviewing Gloria years ago for a podcast about women’s relationships with power, they collaborated on Leading Women.
Gloria began sharing her signature 9 Power Tools curriculum with other expert trainers last year in order to accelerate women’s progress. She trained 16 diverse Leadership Ambassadors in New York City and Phoenix in 2015, all of whom were already experts working in the field, and now are qualified to deliver the training to companies and organizations.
The Santa Barbara training is the third Train-the-Trainer offered by Gloria and Take The Lead Head of Strategy, Lex Schroeder. Gloria said, “We are so excited to connect with courageous women leaders on the West Coast, by bringing Take The Lead’s training to California.”
Fast Facts

  • Women make up more than 50% of the population, are 59% of the college-educated, entry-level workforce, and control 85% of consumer spending.
  • The rapid advances women made into leadership in the 1970s and 1980s have largely stalled.
  • Whether counting women on corporate boards, in the C-suite, in politics, behind the camera or at the editor’s desk – none of the percentages rise above 20%, and most are much lower.

About the Training

  • Certified trainers can incorporate the material into their own brands or teach as a certified Leadership Ambassador with Take The Lead.
  • This training focuses on:
    • Achieving gender parity in leadership, which means advancing women to occupy half of all top leadership and decision-making roles across all sectors by 2025. This goes beyond just teaching them leadership skills.
    • Cracking the code of implicit bias that has held women back to less than 20% of leadership for decades.
    • Changing the definition of power itself. Rejecting the oppressive “power over” and claiming the “power to” accomplish something by joining with others. These concepts change women’s feeling about power from “love-hate” into “I can’t wait to use this!”
    • Fostering “Collaboration as strategy” to achieve collective leadership and systemic change through strategic partnerships.
    • Creating an intergenerational movement of women leaders,
  •  Women who become trainers join a diverse, supportive community of powerful, motivated women of all ages and backgrounds. Some are building their training businesses; all are motivated primarily to uplift and advance other women.
  • The certification process includes marketing assistance and membership in the supportive community of Leadership Ambassadors.
  • There is a fee, however organizers will seek to match participants with scholarships where possible.
  • To apply to take part in the training or for more information http://www.taketheleadwomen.com/leadership-power-tools-training/

About Take The Lead

  • Take The Lead’s 2014 launch, co-sponsored by Arizona State University and dozens of other local and national groups, filled a 3,000-seat auditorium and reached 500,000 globally via livestream.
  • Take The Lead prepares, develops, inspires, and propels women to take their fair and equal share of leadership positions across all sectors by 2025. It’s today’s women’s movement, the needed game changer, a unique way for women to embrace power and leadership parity.
  • In addition to offline leadership events, Take The Lead regularly hosts online learning programs, including free monthly Virtual Happy Hours and on demand learning programs, including the online certificate course version of the “9 Leadership Power Tools To Advance Your Career” workshop.
  • See more than 40 partners in Take The Lead mission
  • Read bios of diverse Leadership Ambassadors

What are you waiting for? If you are an expert trainer and want to join other women leaders, redefine power and help uplift and advance other other women, this Leadership Ambassador Train The Trainer is for you. As a Leadership Ambassador, you will bring this transformative work to new audiences so that together, we can bring women to leadership parity by 2025. Remember, it’s all about collaboration and women helping other women, and together we can do more then we can ever do on our own. Find out more about Train The Trainer HERE.
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Take The Lead Virtual Happy Hour

eventbrite_nancy_oreillyHow Women Can Win by Working Together

 Take The Lead’s unique solutions-driven approach to leadership can help you power UP in your career. Each month in their Virtual Happy Hour series, they sit down with a different expert to share topical wisdom and actionable guidance, and you’ll leave with a take-home Take The Lead exercise to help you apply your new knowledge right away. You’ve got the power TO accelerate your career; they show you how to use it.
I’m excited and honored to be the December 2 guest and invite you to join us!
“You can do more together than you can apart” isn’t just another saying – it’s the truth. Despite some persistent myths, women really can win by working together. We’re problem-solvers and we know how to get things done. Whether you’re looking for ways to tap into the power of your colleagues to meet challenges in the office or need guidance on channeling your power to help live a well-rounded life, tune in next Wednesday, December 2nd at 6:30pm ET. I’ll be chatting live with my Leading Women co-author Gloria Feldt, Co-Founder & President of Take The Lead and sharing my tips that can help you live your best life!
You can register through Eventbrite or through the Take The Lead Women website!
Hope to “see” you there!
 
 

Leading Women and Diversity in the Workplace

diverse ladiesI recently had the opportunity to serve on a panel for the 2015 National Diversity Women’s Business Leadership conference in Orlando. While there I had the opportunity to listen to several wonderful presentations, and was invigorated and inspired by so many smart, amazing, and motivated women gathering in one place. My panel, entitled “So You Think You’re Ready for a Board Seat,” focused on how to use board service to advance your career.
But diversity truly was the overriding theme of everything at the conference. This was refreshing given that the New York Times recently wrote that the word “diversity” has become both euphemism and cliché. Too often it’s a convenient shorthand that gestures at inclusivity and representation without actually taking them seriously. Business literature is full of the importance of authenticity and transparency as key requirements for leadership. Yet for many people of color and for women especially, being authentic and transparent can be challenging, even threatening. The women involved in the conference definitely took inclusion seriously, and had some great words of wisdom for everyone.

Seeking Leadership Positions

There are some startling distinctions between black women and white women in their appetite—and readiness—for executive roles. Ripa Rashid, Senior Vice President with Hewlett Consulting and Partner & Senior Vice President for the Center for Talent Innovation (CTI) reports that data shows only 26% of all women in the U.S. report that they would accept an executive leadership position if offered tomorrow. Research consistently illustrates that women view the burdens of a powerful position outweighing the benefits. Yet, two of CTI’s latest reports, “Women Want Five Things” and “Black Women Ready to Lead,” find that with power, women are more likely to get the things they say they want out of their careers: –to be able to flourish, reach for meaning and purpose, excel, empower others and be empowered. Studies show that black women are more likely than their white female counterparts to pursue a powerful position and to have greater clarity about how the benefits of leadership outweigh the burdens. That’s something every woman can all rally around and definitely learn from.

Cultural Competence is Key

Cultural competence has become the most significant emerging competency for leaders in the culturally diverse workplace and marketplace. One way we can support diversity for all women is to create a space for them to be their authentic selves in the workplace. Christie Smith, Managing Director of Deloitte Consulting, pointed out how most Fortune 500 companies have a diversity and inclusion officer who superintends an impressive array of programs focused on the needs of a diverse workforce, yet reports suggest that full inclusion remains elusive.
The ideal of inclusion has long been to allow individuals to bring their authentic selves to work. However, most inclusion efforts don’t address the pressure to conform that prevents individuals from realizing that ideal. Smith hypothesizes that a model of inclusion analyzing that pressure might benefit historically underrepresented groups. Given that everyone has an authentic self, a culture of greater authenticity might benefit all individuals, including the straight white men who have traditionally been left out of the inclusion paradigm.

The Power of Connectional Intelligence

Erica Dhawan, Founder & CEO of Cotential, addressed diversity and spoke on the power of connectional intelligence. As game-changing a concept as emotional intelligence was in the 90s, connectional intelligence is the human ability to combine knowledge, ambition, and people that is amplified hugely by new technologies. In our hyper connected world, it is changing the future of diversity and inclusion efforts in corporate America by quickly, efficiently and creatively helping people enlist supporters, drive innovation, develop strategies and implement diverse solutions to big problems.

Stay Open To Diversity

George A. Kalogridis, President of Walt Disney World Resort Lake Buena Vista is a vocal champion of diversity and says, “The Walt Disney Company thrives on creativity, great storytelling and exceptional imagination. When you’re looking for people who possess those strengths, you absolutely have to keep open every door and every window. Otherwise, you run the risk of missing out on the individual who can take us to the next level.”

Leading Women Making a Difference

What an inspiring group of powerful women! I left the National Diversity Women’s Business Leadership conference armed with a new perspective and more determined than ever to help women rise into the leadership positions they deserve. The world needs us! And in order to get out there and truly make a difference, we must cherish our differences and support all Leading Women, as we work together and change the world for the better!

Donation To Provide Take The Lead Training for Experienced Presenters

ttl-logo-websiteI don’t know about you, but I’m tired of waiting for women to step into their fair and equal share of power. It’s taking far too long for women to rise. Even though we’re more than half the population, we’re still stuck at around 18% of top leadership positions in business and politics. That’s not nearly enough. Think of all the talented amazing women who are left out of the leadership of the world. It’s time to give them the opportunities they deserve to make a difference.
That’s why I recently donated $50,000 to Take The Lead Women, whose mission is to prepare, develop, inspire, and propel women to take their fair and equal share of leadership across all sectors by 2025. I’m sponsoring a Train the Trainer workshop in Santa Barbara in January 2016 for my co-authors of Leading Women and other successful, experienced leader-trainers. Workshop graduates will become certified to teach Gloria Feldt’s core “9 Leadership Power Tools” curriculum in addition to their own material.GloriaFeldt.jpeg
Women Ready to Change Relationship with Power
When women truly understand and embrace Gloria’s Power Tools, they change their relationship with power. They lose their fear of claiming and using their power to make positive change in the world. That’s what I want for all women everywhere. As more professional trainers become certified to teach these transformative principles, the movement will expand to include exponentially greater numbers of women and men. That’s 70 years earlier than the World Economic Forum predicts! Please join me in the women’s movement for today to make this happen!
We announced my gift at a Take The Lead Presents event in New York City in July. Actress Kathleen Turner (now THERE’S an empowered woman!) spoke on “The Power of a Woman’s Voice” and I was delighted to be in the presence of so many smart amazing women. Together, we can quickly bring women to parity.
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The missions of Take The Lead Women and Women Connect 4 Good are completely aligned. My foundation has always worked to educate women to advance in their careers, improve relationships, mentor other women, and conduct research and publish results. Going forward, we plan to do all of those things together. We are working out the details of how our two organizations will collaborate to advance women to leadership parity by 2025. Watch for more announcements of this collaboration as we move forward.
~Dr. Nancy

Speaking Aug 19 to QBE North America's Women's Initiative Network

QBE’s Business Resource Group Schedules Lunch  & Learn on Women Empowerment

I’m delighted to have the opportunity to speak to the women of QBE North America about empowerment. Such an important topic! On August 19, we’re doing a Lunch & Learn in Irvine, California, with a WebEx link to other QBE women across the country.

44Three Important Keys to Empowering Women

This group includes women of a wide ranges of ages, job descriptions and titles. I’ll be talking with them about three important keys to empowerment that every woman needs to master. I can’t wait!

I think this group could serve as an example to companies everywhere. Investing in and encouraging women doesn’t take anything away from men. In fact, it makes the business stronger for everyone.

About the QBE Women’s Initiative Network

The Women’s Initiative Network (WIN) Business Resource Group is a part of the QBE North America diversity strategy. WIN was established August 2013 and has approximately 197 members. Our group provides new opportunities for our members to network with each other and with executives. In addition, we actively seek participation from men in the organization and believe all thoughts, ideas, and input from both men and women at QBE are essential. Finally, WIN helps QBE North America achieve its company-wide objectives to foster a diverse and inclusive workplace.

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