Feeling Young

Your Big, Bold, Passionate Summer

Seven Ways Women Can Find Adventure in Their Own Backyard (and Why They Should)

If you’re like most women, your life is well entrenched in routine. But Dr. Nancy D. O’Reilly says breaking out of your rut and expanding your world can propel you to success. Here are tips to help you plan the most adventurous summer yet.

Each morning you struggle to wake up and try not to become too frazzled while getting ready for work. Eight or nine (or more) hours later, you come home, check as many chores as possible off your to-do list, and collapse into bed. Wash. Rinse. Repeat. Even your hobbies and downtime are part of the same old routine: book club on Tuesday nights, TV on Thursday nights, dinner with your girlfriends every other Friday.

So what’s wrong with that? Well, a CNN article suggests that trying out new hobbies and discovering new interests might stave off memory loss. But also, says Dr. Nancy D. O’Reilly, when we exist and endure instead of approaching life as an adventure, we not only miss out on lots of fun, but we squander our full potential.

“I’ve been fortunate to meet and work with so many women who are amazing, successful, high-performing leaders in many different fields,” says O’Reilly, who, along with 19 other women, cowrote the new book Leading Women: 20 Influential Women Share Their Secrets to Leadership, Business, and Life (Adams Media, 2015, ISBN: 978-1-440-58417-6, $16.99, www.drnancyoreilly.com). “And one thing they all have in common is their courage and their sense of adventure.

“They’re not satisfied with the same old, same old,” she adds. “They’re out there setting goals, connecting, taking risks—not just professionally but personally too.”

In other words, how we work and how we play are deeply connected. When we approach life with enthusiasm and intensity—whether we’re driving a collaborative project or learning how to surf—we grow, learn, gain new skills, and expand our sphere of influence. And when we see that taking risks pays off, we’re willing to take more.

That’s why O’Reilly has a summer homework assignment for women: Be brave. Try something new and fun. Expand your world. Not only will you increase your joy in the moment, you’ll get practiced at boldness and adventure. With time this attitude will become your default setting, increasing the likelihood of success in all areas of your life.

“The good news is, you don’t have to travel to Timbuktu,” adds O’Reilly. “There are adventures waiting in your own backyard that you have probably never considered.”

Here, she shares seven tips to help you wring every drop of joy and excitement out of this summer:
Don’t waste the weekend. How many times have you realized that it’s Sunday evening and you haven’t accomplished any of the things you meant to over the weekend (other than sleeping in and binge-watching a show on Netflix)? This summer, O’Reilly encourages you to make the most of your weekends by rising early(ish) and spending your time purposefully.

“Set a goal for every weekend to do something you’ve never done before, whether it’s visiting a new state park, learning a new sport, throwing a neighborhood block party, or even just cooking a new type of cuisine for dinner,” O’Reilly suggests. “And accept the fact that these types of activities almost never happen on the fly—you need to talk to your family and decide in advance how you want to spend each weekend.”

Get out of your vacation rut. Is your family going to a certain beach this summer because, well, that’s what you always do? Even if your family thoroughly enjoys a familiar destination, consider making plans to visit a new place this summer. For example, instead of experiencing the surf and sand, you might rent a mountain cabin or plan a road trip through several national parks.

“Vacationing in a new place will be a treat for your brain, your eyes, your taste buds, and more,” O’Reilly comments. “You’ll probably meet interesting new people as well. It’s fine to use some of your vacation time to rest and rejuvenate—but be sure to plan a few adventures too. Maybe this will be the year you finally take that surfing lesson or tour the landmark you’ve always wanted to visit.”

Find creative new day-trip destinations. Imagine a 100-mile radius around your home. Chances are, there are more fun places and events in that radius than you can cram into one summer: hiking trails, historic sites, lakes, new restaurants, museums, community theaters, festivals, and more. Whether your family is taking an out-of-town vacation or not, plan to visit some of them. (What better way to make the most of your weekends?)

“Some friends of mine block out one weekend every month for a day trip,” O’Reilly shares. “They keep a folder full of clippings and ideas, and they are slowly working their way through it. What a great idea! Remember, adventure isn’t something that can be found only hundreds of miles away. You may be surprised by what your area has to offer, and by how much it has grown and changed while you’ve been stuck in a rut.”

Learn a fun new skill. One of the great things about summer is that the pace of daily life does tend to slow down somewhat. Take advantage of longer days and more relaxed schedules by taking the time to learn something new. Sign up for a class, join a club, or ask a friend to share her expertise.

“Your new skill could be kayaking, target shooting, water skiing, mountain biking, yoga, woodworking, or even skydiving,” O’Reilly says. “If you’re not at least a little nervous about what you’ve chosen to do, move on to something else. Remember, the idea is to challenge and exhilarate yourself—and that won’t happen if you’re not stretching beyond the boundaries of what feels comfortable.”

Do at least one thing to give back to your community. Men and women who care enough about others to volunteer their time, talents, and treasure are the kinds of people you want to meet. And on a personal level, giving back enhances gratitude and contentment, and can even reduce stress levels. So whether your “cause” is homeless animals, adult literacy, or clean oceans, get involved this summer.

“I want to be clear that giving back doesn’t have to mean writing a big check,” O’Reilly comments. “Your time and talents are just as impactful. If you can’t find a preexisting organization in your community that speaks to your heart, pull together a group of likeminded folks and start your own project, like a community vegetable garden.”

Make a point to meet new people. Your kids will meet new friends during summer sports and day camp—and you should try to do the same! If you’re putting O’Reilly’s previous tips into practice, you’ll already have dozens of new people in your orbit. You might also attend networking events, get on a new team at work, introduce yourself to familiar faces at the gym, and respond “yes” to more social invitations.

“I would especially encourage you to seek out other women,” O’Reilly urges. “Women inherently know how to make satisfying, mutually fulfilling connections. In fact, I am seeing the growth of a true women-helping-women movement in which we are creating an ever-expanding network that offers expertise and support to women in business, government, education, philanthropy, and other fields.

“Most of us are so busy and overwhelmed that we just don’t make it a priority to connect with other women,” she adds. “But when you’re purposeful about doing this, your life will become richer, more exciting, and more creative. When we join hands, we can accomplish so much.”

Do all of these things in the spirit of joy and gratitude. There’s one important caveat when it comes to stretching your boundaries and planning an exciting, adventurous summer: You have to approach this goal with a positive, open attitude. Otherwise, your plans won’t feel any different from the other uninspiring items on your to-do list, and they definitely won’t help you to take your power and reach your potential.

“That said, when you’re in the midst of the daily grind, summoning up positivity can be easier said than done,” O’Reilly admits. “The good news is, a significant amount of our happiness comes from the ways we perceive our world—and we can choose to have an attitude of gratitude. Instead of thinking of what you have to do, focus on what you get to do. Every time you learn something new, receive a new opportunity, or learn a new skill this summer, allow yourself to savor the moment and say thanks. You’ll find that your joy levels steadily rise—and that you are more and more excited to expand your world.”

“As an adult you may not get a summer vacation—but it’s time to recapture the excitement and anticipation you felt as a child at the beginning of each summer season,” O’Reilly concludes. “Start with one or two ‘adventures’ from the list above and notice the changes in your mood, creativity, motivation, and maybe even energy levels. Here’s to the most exciting summer you’ve had in years—and to expanding your potential!”

~

Originally appeared in “Home Based Working Moms” May, 2015.

Secrets to Being and Looking Your Best

I firmly believe each of us should do whatever makes us feel good about ourselves, and that means looking our best.  Find out how stress, anxiety and aging affect the faces we show to the world – and discover what you can do about it from Dr. Glynis Ablon at 4:30 pm on Feb. 6, 2016, in the La Marina Room at Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore.
Then hear more news about Leading Women and how women helping other women is turning into the new women’s movement. It is an exciting time to be a women.  If you’re in the Santa Barbara area on February 6, please click here Look Great Event to RSVP and come see me and Dr. Ablon.
Look Great Event
 
 

Celebrate The Confidence That Comes With Age

DNOFashionwebBeauty begins the moment you decide to be yourself – Coco Chanel
For decades we have been barraged with younger women dominating the runway and fashion magazines. Just recently though, a handful of fashion brands have decided to break the mold and are championing the older woman. Yves Saint Laurent has announced Joni Mitchell (71 years old) as its latest model, and Joan Didion (80 years old) was revealed as the face of Céline. Last fall, 69-year-old Helen Mirren was announced as the new face of L’Oreal, joining fellow Oscar winner Jane Fonda, 77, in representing the brand alongside notable women half — and even a third — of their ages.
Cindy Crawford recently made the news for a leaked, un-retouched image that showed her in all of her 48-year-old glory. Marie Claire doesn’t deny the authenticity of the photos, and said the images reveal, “a body that defies expectations — it is real, it is honest, and it is gorgeous.”
These women have one thing in common – confidence. Diane von Furstenberg, who has made a name for herself admittedly “selling confidence” through fashion. recently spoke at the fifth annual Women Entrepreneurs Festival. During her speech she said, “The most important relationship in life is the one you have with yourself. If you have that, any other relationship is a plus and not a must.”
The older you get, the more comfortable you are in your skin. As women step into their 40s, 50s, and beyond, they begin, often for the first time, to build a relationship with self. With that relationship, a woman’s confidence and authenticity come into play that she might have been lacking in her teens and 20s.
Suzanne Boyd, editor-in-chief of Zoomer Magazine was recently quoted as saying, “There’s a lot of mystique being taken out of fashion, and what these women have is mystique. They have their own style. They’ve never followed fashion. They’ve just been who they are and there’s nothing more stylish or chic than that — and they’re not playing in the same sandbox. To the fashion eye, it’s not about beauty or glamour — it’s about true achievement and authenticity.”
Women are often embarrassed to speak about their fears, yet in my own research I found nearly half of 1,200 women I surveyed (47%) were afraid of getting older. This fear correlates with perceptions of the aging process, including health behaviors, emotional and cognitive responses to stimulus words, abdominal (immune) health, confidence in self-care ability, and more.
There’s nothing wrong with getting older. Who among us would choose not to live longer? Celebrate these women who are removing the cultural stigma of aging, and let their confidence bubble over into your own life. Use the wisdom and authenticity that comes with experience, and march confidently into the boardroom or down the runway!
 

Extra Fat Actually Provides Some Health Benefits

Healthy strong vital woman

Healthy strong vital woman

Most women we know agonize over every bite of dessert and feel vaguely guilty about eating things like pancakes or pasta. Kind of takes the fun out of it and definitely hurts our self-esteem! “I was bad today,” we’ll say.

Here’s great news for all of us that run a little on the heavy side!  A bit of extra body fat isn’t nearly the health risk that we’ve been told. In fact, a little padding might even improve your health! Really!  This was the conclusion of a recent study at the Centers for Disease Control by Dr. Katherine Flegal, who analyzed 97 studies involving more than 2.8 million people.

As you would expect, severe obesity clearly hurts your health. A BMI over 35 increases our risk of dying. (That’s a weight of 210 pounds on a woman 5′ 5″ tall.) So it’s important to get those numbers down if you’re in this category. You’ll feel the benefits immediately.

A Little Overweight No Big Deal

But guess what: that same 5’5″ woman at 180 pounds (a BMI of 30) does NOT have an increased risk of dying.  The truth is, there’s a small protective factor, perhaps because a bit of extra weight is a reserve should a person become ill with a wasting disease like cancer. Fat cells also produce estrogen, which may help ease the menopausal transition, and provide padding the the case of a fall. These are both reasons that buxom gals are at lower risk for osteoporosis and fractures.

It’s clear that proper nutrition and regular exercise to promote fitness may be much more important than a few extra pounds. I think we should all follow Julia Childs’ advice:  “Enjoy your meals.”

Thank you Dr. Katherine Flegal. Good food is one of the great pleasures in life.

Follow the Money

It’s worth noting that our much-touted epidemic of obesity increased by 37 million people in a single day. Pretty fast weight gain, you say? Actually, it happened in 1998 when an “expert” panel for the National Institutes of Health redefined the categories of “overweight” and “obese.”  Voila! More customers for the gazillion dollar a year weight-loss industry, to which 90% of the panel members had financial ties.  Funny how that works!

Critics Try To Distract Women From Exercising  Power

As for people who focus on a woman’s weight rather than her ideas, actions or character, we like what Gloria Steinem had to say: “If our bodies are treated as ornaments instead of instruments that’s because we are rebelling…it’s an effort to distract us.” Let’s keep our eyes on the prize of making a better world for ourselves, our families, and all women everywhere. And oh yes — keep enjoying our meals!

 

Body Image Influences Self-Esteem

Radiant Health

Many women tell me they grew up with messages that greatly affected their self-images. These messages continue to influence how they see their reflections in the mirror today, and it often does not match up with the way they think it should look.

They think they are too fat, too short, too tall, not pretty, or not like other women. We think this way because the images we see on the newsstand or at the grocery checkout counter offer a distorted view of reality. The covers either feature young girls smiling because they are young and beautiful or hideously unflattering pictures of stars hiding from the camera because they look fat and ugly. There are never any pictures of ordinary human females women who look like us and feel fine.

Self-esteem is how a person feels about the inside and the outside. Women who have poor self-esteem have heard messages while growing up that said, “You do not measure up to all the other pretty, thin, smart girls.” These messages can have lifelong consequences. Women in our focus groups told us they heard many of these messages and also felt their mothers had a hard time with age and really worried about losing their looks.

How to Avoid Answering a Rude Question

Although coping with society’s external views of older women can be annoying, women have devised a number of coping strategies. Susan tells her age proudly, knowing that she looks healthy and strong. Marla shrugs it off, ignores it, then vents by laughing and complaining with her friends. Kathy refuses to tell anyone her age because she refuses to be categorized that way. Carol answers questions about her age by replying, “That is only relevant if we’re talking about age discrimination.” How old are you? If it bothers you to be asked, go ahead and devise a cute remark to deflect what is, after all, a rude question: “Old enough to know better; Young enough to want more; Oh, I’m about your age; What’s it to you? Why do you ask?”

That way you can leave your age to the imagination of the perceiver.

by Dr. Nancy O’Reilly, author of “Timeless Women Speak, Feeling Youthful at Any Age.”

Seventeen Magazine to End Photoshopping of Models

Young women have taken matters into their own hands and scored a victory, according to a exciting post July 4th, 2012 by Emma Stydahar at Spark A Movement.
Objecting to the ways women and girls are portrayed in print magazines, organizers gathered nearly 30,000 signatures asking that women and girls be portrayed  more realistic.

———

They cited studies showing that girls become depressed after just 30 minutes of looking at a fashion magazine.

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No More Photoshop'd Images of Women in the Media
  1. The July issue of Seventeen announced that the face and body sizes of the models in their magazines will not be digitally altered in any of the spreads in the magazine.
  2. Vogue  announced it would not use models under the age of 16 or who appear to have an eating disorder

The young women have launched a campaign against Teen Vogue, but do not yet have positive results to report. But these girls are tigers so watch for more news! They ask girls to send photos GO TEAM!
 

 

Build Your Self-Esteem with Positive Thoughts and Nine Crucial Actions

Build Sef Esteem with Positive ThoughtsMany women have told me they grew up hearing messages that greatly harmed their self-images. These messages continue to influence how they see their reflections in the mirror today, and it often does not match up with the way they think they should look. What do you think when you look in a mirror? Do you think you are too fat, too short, too tall, not pretty, or not like other women?

We think this way because the images we see on magazines at the newsstand or at the grocery checkout counter offer a distorted view of reality. The covers either feature girls smiling because they are young and beautiful or hideously unflattering pictures of stars hiding from the camera because they look fat and ugly. There are never any pictures of ordinary human females women who look like us and feel just fine, thank you very much!

Self-esteem is how a person feels about the inside and the outside. Women who have poor self-esteem have heard messages while growing up that said, “You do not measure up to all the other pretty, thin, smart girls.” These messages can have lifelong consequences. Women in focus groups told me they heard many of these messages and also felt their mothers had a hard time with age and really worried about losing their looks.

Although coping with society’s external views of older women can be annoying, women have devised a number of coping strategies. Susan tells her age proudly, knowing that she looks healthy and strong. Marla shrugs it off, ignores it, then vents by laughing and complaining with her friends. Kathy refuses to tell anyone her age because she refuses to be categorized that way. Carol answers questions about her age by replying, “That is only relevant if we’re talking about age discrimination.” How old are you? If it bothers you to be asked, say: “Old enough to know better; Young enough to want more; Oh, about your age; What’s it to you?” That way you can leave your age to the imagination of the perceiver.

A fear of aging is not a rational response. It’s just an emotion. Even if you were once embarrassed to tell your age or admit you are past menopause, you can take back your personal power.

First, be aware of––and don’t be manipulated by––media messages. Next, identify and face what you are really afraid of. You may want to work with a therapist or a focus group of trusted girlfriends to do this.

Identify the negative messages you learned growing up and replace them with positive statements about yourself.

Positive Thinking Tips:

  • I have a great smile and eyes, not — I’m just not pretty.
  • I look good for my age, not — I look old and decrepit.
  • My knowledge, wisdom, and skills increase daily, not — I am too old.
  • I am a valuable human being, not – I am worthless.
  • I succeed at many things I try, not — I’m a failure.
  • I’m a lucky to grow older, not — I hate growing older.

Body image issues and perfectionism add up to problems for young girls and women including eating disorders. A woman who has a distorted body image sees her body primarily in terms of some imperfection that she constantly thinks and worries about. Often these women perceive themselves as out of proportion or damaged in some way. This misperception, along with low self-esteem, can lead not only to eating disorders, but also to depression, anxiety and other types of phobias. These conditions all warrant medical and psychological treatment as soon as possible.

Nine steps to begin improving your self-image without plastic surgery

  1. Surround yourself with beauty, artwork, bright colors, good music and healthy foods.
  2. Get exercise and feel your body move.
  3. Surround yourself with happy, fun, loving people.
  4. Get rid of toxic people in your life, the ones who bring you down, belittle you, or criticize you.
  5. Do not allow anyone to abuse you or neglect you.
  6. Send out love and people will flock to you.
  7. Be what you want to be.
  8. Act “as if” you are beautiful and you will be beautiful.
  9. Your thoughts and actions will make the world a beautiful place to live.

Women can learn to find a positive self-image within themselves. Changing your environment, both on the inside and on the outside, will bring you in touch with your own positive self-esteem, dignity, and worth.

Achieve Healthiest, Most Love-Filled Life

Health Writer and author of Healthy Sexy Happy

Nancy Deville


I recently spoke to health and life quality guru Nancy Deville. She is an amazing woman in the height of her powers and beauty. She offered a simple blueprint any woman can follow to achieve better health and happiness.

Say something good to yourself.

Too often we are masters at putting ourselves down, and Nancy Deville says it’s time to stop that! Instead, we need to develop a meditation program to give ourselves positive reinforcement.

In fact, why wait to meditate: start now and while you’re waiting in line at the grocery store or held up in traffic….just say something good to yourself!

Where can I start to improve my health being?

Start where you are, Nancy says. Regardless where they start, women can achieve achieve their own optimal health. And when you achieve optimal health, everything else falls into place. Because  being healthy is sexy and it is happy.

It’s not a competition.

It’s not that someone’s more attractive than you are and you’ll never have that. It’s about achieving what you can achieve with what you’ve been given. You only have one body, so love it and take care of it.

How can I reduce inflammation in my body?

The key to reducing dangerous inflammation in your body is to lead an anti-inflammatory lifestyle, Nancy says. That means eating real food, keeping hydrated, sleeping enough, and resting enough. It also means managing your stress level, because stress is extremely inflammatory.
To reduce the substances and behaviors that cause inflammation, it’s especially helpful to look at your addictions to stimulants such as…caffeine, sugar, tobacco and drugs. Alcohol, technically a depressant no matter how great it makes you feel at first, is also harmful when abused.

How can I regain my health?

Just start today, because the human body desires to be well, Nancy says.  Make a point to give your  body the materials it needs to build back up, especially if you’re ill and overweight. If you’ve been ill, don’t despair. A health crisis is a golden opportunity — a wake-up call. You are going to get healthier with every small step you take in these directions.
It’s really fun when you start getting healthy, she said. In fact, a healthy lifestyle and body bring their own rewards.
~Dr. Nancy

Why Manage Stress

co-founder of Women to Women Clinic and author of Are You Tired and Wired
Nurse Practitioner, Marcelle Pick wants you to ask yourself these questions: Are you racing through your day afraid that if you sit down, you’ll stop? Or are you simply overwhelmed, exhausted and trying to cope with everything and everyone who needs your care?
If neither of these describes you, congratulations! You are in the minority. Hundreds of thousands of women are multitasking themselves into chronic stress and adrenal dysfunction. It’s not just about gaining weight any more; it is seriously harmful to your health.
Amazing guest Marcelle Pick tells just how bad it can be for you physically, emotionally and mentally in her new book, Are You Tired and Wired. Marcelle is a nurse practitioner who co-founded one of the first clinics for women by women in 1985. Women to Women Clinic specializes in women’s health care and she has seen every aspect of the harmful effects of overwhelming stress.
Find out about Marcelle’s work and her enlightening analysis and advice for women piling on too many stress-producing tasks and what adrenal dysfunction could mean for you.

Live with Passionate Optimism: Survive a Crisis In Health, Make This Best Year

By Dr. Nancy D. O’Reilly, Psy.D.

If you are waiting for something to happen before you can be happy and feel good about your life, you need to stop waiting and be happy now.  Get out of the doldrums and “Carpe Diem!” That’s Latin for Seize the Day!

That’s the philosophy of Dr. Elaine Dembe, a 62-year-old chiropractor from Toronto, Canada. She is also an inspiring keynote speaker, one of Canada’s outstanding authorities on stress resiliency, longevity and motivation, and an elite athlete who has run 17 marathons and celebrated her 60th birthday by climbing Mount Kilimanjaro.

Dr. Elaine advises women to continually try new things and challenge themselves, as well as to keep in shape. Her two best-selling books are Use the Good Dishes: Finding Joy in Everyday Life and Passionate Longevity: The 10 Secrets to Growing Younger.

Women who continue to feel young and happy throughout the decades of their lives usually have someone they look up to and regard as a mentor. My own role model for passionate living was my dear grandmother, Mama Nancy, who never let her tiny stature make her feel small.

Dr. Elaine is a role model of being all you can be and not letting those birthday candles dictate what you can do. She says too many people ask, “How can I do that at my age?” instead of focusing on what they want and doing it anyway.

When Dr. Elaine was about 30 she started running to get back in shape after completing chiropractic school. “I wanted to give my patients a good example,” Elaine says. “There weren’t that many women running at that time.”  She became the go-to woman for local television stations interested in sports injuries.

She faced the major losses of divorce and her mother’s death, then decided to write a book about extraordinary older adults. “They were living the kind of life I wanted to live.”

Strengthen Bonds This Year

It’s sad when women allow themselves to feel invisible and dismissed as they get older. Not Dr. Elaine! “Growing older is a time to strengthen bonds,” she says. “It is a time for personal growth, for tapping into your own inner wisdom, your own creativity. These are the things that keep you passionate and young.” Dr. Elaine refuses to allow bodily frailty to slow her down. “Right now I have osteoarthritis in my right big toe. Thankfully, it doesn’t bother me when I run, but I can’t wear high heels.

Rather than complaining that our society doesn’t revere older people, Dr. Elaine cites a Buddhist philosophy: “Comparing is the root cause of suffering.” You can choose to be grateful and appreciative of waking up today, or you can compare today to how you felt 30 years ago.

She’s also an optimist, and optimists are happier, healthier and they live longer than pessimists. Dr. Elaine says people who have the greatest difficulty have pessimistic thoughts like, “Oh, what’s the use. I can’t do it anymore. I’m getting older.” Be aware of what you’re thinking, she cautions. Challenge your pessimistic thoughts…and ask, “Wait a minute is this true?”

Return to Your Basic, Happy State

People who stay healthy, fit and happy as they grow older tend to be resilient optimists with “an unsinkable spirit.” Even when they are challenged or feel sad, they dig themselves out of the pit and return to a basic happy state. She says it helps to interpret events as having meaning and purpose and to say things like, “It was meant to be. I know I’m going to get through this.”

I’ve seen this happen in my crisis response work. I was there after 911, after the fires in California and Hurricane Katrina. I saw people who had gone through the worst event of their lives saying, “Well, I still have my house” or “I still have my children.” Dr. Elaine and I agree that the people who do the very best are fluid and flexible with good support systems. They have:

  • Healthy relationships
  • Manageable levels of conflict
  • Equanimity
  • Family or friends who love and support them
  • Faith that helped them
  • Modest needs
  • An ability to find joy in everyday little things.

“Happiness is there all over the place,” Dr. Elaine says. “You just have to open your eyes and see it.”

As a psychologist, I know people need to give themselves permission: “It’s okay to feel good. It’s okay to be successful. It’s okay to have love. It’s okay to belong.” That’s one of the benefits of getting older: we stop worrying about what other people think and give permission to be ourselves with passion and purpose. When people find their authentic voice and the elite human being inside, they discover they have so much to offer. Dr. Elaine offers several keys for connecting with your authentic self. She urges us to focus on keeping our bodies strong so our health span of disability-free years will match our life spans.

Do This for Physical and Mental Health

Her prescription:

  • Train with weights
  • Cultivate core muscle strength
  • Reduce body fat through good nutrition
  • Get 7 to 8 hours of sleep
  • Be optimistic
  • Maintain healthy relationships
  • Find something you love to do
  • Keep your brain strong by continuing to learn
  • Do something that scares you that you never thought you could do.

Most of all, she says we should challenge ourselves to find our courage. Don’t sit back and rust out! Dr. Elaine had never written books before, but now she has written two bestsellers. She started rapping, then she learned to tap dance. She loves being in an “expansion mode” where she thinks, “What’s the next thing I’m going to do?” There’s no end to wonderful things out there.

Let’s follow Dr. Elaine’s example. Let’s NOT put up boundaries and limit what we can do. Instead, we can keep ourselves healthy and growing, vibrant and alive, throughout our lives!

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