Leadership

Change How Women are Portrayed in the Media

How can I use my power to change women’s image in the media?

Missrepresentation trailer screen shot

Click to view trailer


Our media denigrate even the most powerful women in our country such as Hilary Clinton, Condoleezza Rice, Sarah Palin and Nancy Pelosi.
Commentators focus on whether they had plastic surgery, what they wear, and how old they look.
What chance does an ordinary woman have to be seen and appreciated as a whole person?

Steps needed to change women’s images in the media

Below are the steps to power that were outlined in the first email we received after we signed up…
Thanks for joining our movement to end sexism! Now that you’ve taken the MissRepresentation.org pledge, here are some actions you can take immediately to make a difference:

  1. Tell 5 people about the film and share one thing you learned from watching it.
  2. Parents- watch TV and films with your children.  Raise questions like “What if that character had been a girl instead?”
  3. Remember your actions influence others. Mothers, aunts and loved ones- don’t downgrade or judge yourself by your looks. Fathers, uncles and loved ones—treat women around you with respect.  Remember children in your life are watching and learning from you.
  4. Use your consumer power. Stop buying tabloid magazines and watching shows that degrade women. Go see movies that are written and directed by women (especially on opening weekend to boost the box off ratings). Avoid products that resort to sexism in their advertising.
  5. Mentor others! It’s as easy as taking a young woman to lunch. Start by having open and honest conversations with a young people in your life.

You are now dialed into a national movement to stand up to sexism and challenge the media’s limiting portrayals of gender. Together we will make a huge impact on contemporary society.
Don’t forget to visit missrepresentation.org for frequent updates and other ways of getting involved.
Each week we’ll send you additional steps you can take to make change. Thanks!
Warmly,
Jennifer Siebel Newsom and the MissRepresentation.org Team

Take the five steps to changing women’s image in the media at missrepresentation.org.

How to Get Members Excited About Your Group

I would  like to  get members excited about my chapter or organization

Cynthia DAmour

Cynthia D’Amour


Cynthia D’Amour, founder of the Chapter Leaders Playground, posted a webinar 10-7-2011. During the webinar she polled listeners and found that 93% wanted some help increasing enthusiasm for their group. Only 7% said that all their members are totally excited about their group.
Cynthia’s Point on How to Increase Enthusiasm

  • Remember as leaders we have to reach out to lots of people – expand the opportunity
  • Create the vision – put it into words why it matters, why it’s important. This vision statement creates an emotional connection, so use this concept all the time.
  • Make sure you are paying them in value for the time they spend.
  • Let each member feel part of the vision. Make sure every member can answer: Why do we exist – why are we special?

How do I get members to participate and excited?

  1. Request their help and support in every meeting, in every contact – remind them why they are there. Why they are giving their time
  2. Make the human connections – heart to heart. Why does it matter? Get me to the heart so I feel like I’ve made a good investment of my time. Make it sexy and exciting. Who are we here to serve, what we will do to help? Want a 10 on Emotional connection scale. What’s the impact on others? How pull people to us?
  3. Make clear for each member: What is the connection between MY presence and the mission
  4. Make the vision easy to explain and specific. We come together here because we do THIS….. Make sure everyone can articulate it.
  5. Make your members superheroes – they are involved and doing great work. It’s not about the leaders. About your members doing great stuff.

How do I use my vision statement?

  • With enthusiasm, NOT by rote
  • Repeat it regularly – won’t hear it the first time (6-8 exposures) – keep it fresh
  • With pride – people hungry for someone to be proud of them
  • Pull it from them – Esp young ones want participative model. Become skilled facilitator at having THEM articulate it so they feel ownership. People want to make a meaningful difference. Co-create it together
  • At the start of EVERY meeting, every newsletter. Facebook page. Every communication. Make sure they feel connected in between meetings for the emotional glue – maybe a private group online to maintain the coolness and value of the connection

What are the biggest mistakes that kill enthusiasm?

  • Don’t bother to do the above – lose emotional glue that keeps people members.  Odds of creating an amazing experience go down
  • Parental mode—it’s the Right Thing To Do. Especially alienates the young. Not relevant to me – don’t push and tell me.
  • Forget to use the vision statements. Why does board exist? What are you trying to do this year? Why does it matter? Create pictures of the possibility to keep the emotional connection.

Questions to build enthusiasm

  • Let’s talk about why this matters. If we do this well what will we hear people talk about?
  • What will we see people doing?
  • How will people feel?

Why should I build enthusiasm?

  • Easy to do
  • Payoff is better
  • Members happier to be part of something big

Three Women Activists Win Nobel Peace Prize

Nobel Foundation buildingOSLO, Norway (AP) — The 2011 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded  today to three women: Africa’s first democratically elected female president, a Liberian campaigner against rape and a woman who stood up to Yemen’s autocratic regime. The award recognizes the importance of women’s rights in the spread of global peace.

The Nobel website says the prize was motivated by “their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women’s rights to full participation in peace-building work.”

The 10 million kronor ($1.5 million) award was divided among Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, women’s rights activist Leymah Gbowee from the same African country and democracy activist Tawakkul Karman of Yemen. Karman is the first Arab woman to win the prize.

Liberia’s Sirleaf, nicknamed “Iron Lady,” became Africa’s first democratically elected female leader in 2005. Gbowee, who organized a group of Christian and Muslim women to challenge Liberia’s warlords, was honored for mobilizing women. Karman heads the human rights group Women Journalists without Chains and has been a leading figure in organizing this year’s protests in Yemen.

Read the whole story here.

Why Leaders Struggle to Create Strong Chapters

Why do volunteer leaders struggle to create a strong chapter?

People Power Unlimited logoLazy Leader Guru Cynthia D’Amour  surveyed 650 volunteer leaders to learn their views about their leadership experiences and more.
She found three major themes.

1. ‘No Time’ is the cover-all smoke screen.

  • People don’t have time to join.
  • Members don’t have time to volunteer.
  • Volunteers don’t have time to do what they say they will.
  • No one has time to become a leader.

Cynthia says, “Good people just give up the ship when the no-time claim is raised. Few ask, ‘How can we make this so appealing people will make time?’”

2. Focusing on what you lack is the black mold of volunteer leaders.

The overwhelming majority of leaders surveyed focused on what they did not have. This poisons the chapter and makes it nearly impossible to get people involved. Instead, talk about what’s working, and what can be made better.

3. Successful leaders know how to generate excitement and fun!

Bring energy to your chapter by acting like a marketer and “selling” the fun and meaningful involvement your chapter offers. More people will be willing to join, to step up to volunteer,  and to lead your chapter into the future.

What are you going to do with what you learned from the leadership experience survey?

Soar As Iron Butterflies

World leadership is undergoing a quiet revolution

Author of Iron Butterflies

Birute Regine

You won’t find out about it in the headlines or on the chatter of morning talk. But it’s there and it’s happening in waves among women who are slowly recognizing their power and how they can work together to find the balance that has been missing from world leadership.
One of the most resonating voices reporting on the progress of the revolution is Dr. Birute Regine. This amazing author, educator and developmental psychologist spent eight years on a labor of love interviewing women from all walks of life: from world political leaders to dancers, CEO’s and even a wise aboriginal elder. Then she coined the phrase, “Iron Butterflies,” to describe women who understand their strengths as women—their flexibility, vulnerability and knowledge of cooperation and collaboration to lead others and achieve balance and success themselves.
Iron Butterflies: Women Transforming Themselves and The World promises to be a landmark book charting women’s progress in the 21st century.  Listen to this inspirational Conversation with Dr. Nancy to learn how women are evolving and revolutionizing world leadership and how you can take your place among them.

 

Get Their Voices Heard

Claire Damken Brown

Dr. Claire Damken Brown

Do you feel tuned out and turned off by the men you work with?
Whether it’s your boss, co-worker or life partner you’re trying to get through to, if it’s a man, you need to hear this week’s Conversation with Dr. Nancy.
Dr. Claire Brown is an amazing communication expert, women’s advocate and savvy speaker with 25 years of experience working with Fortune 50 companies. Claire joined forces with Dr. Audrey Nelson, an internationally known communication specialist to co-author a groundbreaking new book, Code Switching, How to Talk So Men Will Listen.
Code Switching offers a way to reach across the aisle and open the lines of communication between men and women, crack the gender code and speak in common terms. It’s amazing, when you speak their language, how men respond, work gets done and leadership is recognized.
Learn what it takes to transform your power of speech when you cross the gender divide of communication.

 

Timeless Women Get Their Voices Heard

Do you feel tuned out and turned off by the men you work with?

Whether it’s your boss, co-worker or life partner you’re trying to get through to, if it’s a man, you need to hear this week’s Conversation with Dr. Nancy.

Dr. Claire Brown is an amazing communication expert, women’s advocate and savvy speaker with 25 years of experience working with Fortune 50 companies. Claire joined forces with Dr. Audrey Nelson, an internationally known communication specialist to co-author a groundbreaking new book, Code Switching, How to Talk So Men Will Listen.

Code Switching offers a way to reach across the aisle and open the lines of communication between men and women, crack the gender code and speak in common terms. It’s amazing, when you speak their language, how men respond, work gets done and leadership is recognized.

Learn what it takes to transform your power of communication when you cross the gender divide of communication. Listen to Dr. Nancy’s Conversation with Dr. Claire Brown.

Scroll to top

© Women Connect4Good, Inc. All Rights Reserved.